On my way to work in this old thing!
Image: Getty

A New Jersey art teacher named Julia Mooney is attempting to teach her wards a lesson in sustainability by wearing the same dress 100 days in a row, reports the New York Post. Interesting! Really, though. It is.

Mooney’s endeavor is not as gross as it necessarily sounds. The dress in question is washed. Occasionally she wears an apron over the dress to prevent it from getting stained. “The fashion industry is a huge polluter,” she told local affiliate WPVI. “It’s very wasteful and for what? So we can look cool every day?”

It’s a noble effort to teach a valuable lesson, but also a moderately to extremely interesting thought experiment that has caused the Jezebel staff to reflect upon their shit and think this through. Dressing to look “cool” every day in an office where 95 percent of my time is spent staring at a computer and not looking at anyone else is not a priority, though stunting (albeit briefly) on the walk to the bathroom or down the stairs to the kitchen to get water is nice.

What if I could eliminate the hours I spend gazing into the depths of my closet and selecting an item appropriate for public consumption? Would my life improve? Would I feel inner peace? More importantly, what in the hell would I feel FINE wearing for 100 days in a row wthout complaint, crippling self-doubt, or unease?

Senior staff writer Maria Sherman informed me that she already does this, to some degree: “I already wear a black dress everyday (more or less) so I’d just pick one I’m most comfortable in—probably something cotton that hits above the knee, but with a collar so if I’m going somewhere nice I’m presentable-adjacent?” she said. “Also in this scenario I’ve moved somewhere beautiful where the weather is mostly consistent, like Marfa or some shit. I’ve started a new life in my one frock. It’s beautiful here.”

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Kelly Faircloth slid into my DMs to say that “mine is the dress I’ve already been wearing for 100 days. My blue chambray thing.” I’ve seen the dress; it’s a good dress! Katie McDonough proffered a logical answer: jeans, a “good sweater” and a t-shirt worn underneath that was switched out every few days. Hazel Cills, ever sensible, chose a t-shirt dress. Were I to undertake this challenge, there’s a black dress in my closet that makes me feel comfortable but also moderately attractive; if weather did not permit bare legs, I’d lean into my worst instincts: leggings; a sweatshirt long enough to cover my ass; sneakers. Boring. Comfortable. Just fine.