Hereditary Director Ari Aster on Taking Family Tragedy and Curdling It Into a Nightmare

Last week, I met Ari Aster, the writer and director of the horror film Hereditary, in the A24 office. For about 20 minutes, we talked about genre (he originally shopped Hereditary as a “family tragedy that curdles into a nightmare”), subverting expectations (undoubtedly a reason the film has proved so divisive), the…

Toni Collette on the Horror and Beauty of Grief in Hereditary

“H’aw’ya?” Toni Collette asked me as I entered the conference room at A24's New York City office on Monday. It’s hard to say which was weirder: hearing the actor’s natural Australian accent or seeing her warm and smiling. She spends much of the movie she was in town promoting—Ari Aster’s familial tragedy/horror hybrid …

Gina Gershon Didn't Like Scripts She Was Receiving, so She Wrote Her Own One-Woman Show

“We can’t do a whole interview about Showgirls,” Gina Gershon exhaled, not five minutes into our conversation at Odeon in Tribeca on May 21. I didn’t mean to exasperate her so soon—I couldn’t help it. The woman who played Cristal Connors in Paul Verhoeven’s cult classic of Vegas excess and g-strings—a movie I have…

Talking With Tanya Saracho About Vida, Her Thrilling New Queer Latinx TV Series

On Sunday, Starz will air the first episode of Vida, a new series about two Mexican American sisters who, after their mother’s death, return to their quickly gentrifying neighborhood on the Eastside of LA. The show is groundbreaking, you may have heard, for its writer’s room, which is helmed by Mexican-born playwright…

A Conversation With Andie MacDowell on the Messiness of Grief in Her Film Love After Love

In her new film, Love After Love, Andie MacDowell plays Suzanne, a woman whose perfect life falls apart after the sudden death of her husband. Two adult children grieve alongside her—Nicholas (Chris O’Dowd), an unhappily married novelist, knows he’s Suzanne’s favorite son, while Chris (James Adomian), a directionless…

Director Lynne Ramsay: 'I'm Uncertain About What Reality Is in This World'

Scottish director Lynne Ramsay has made just four features in almost 20 years, which on one hand sucks, if you’re a fan of quality cinema. But on the other, it means her batting average is 1,000. Her films—1999's Ratcatcher, 2002's Morvern Callar, 2011's We Need to Talk About Kevin, and this year’s You Were Never…

Chloë Sevigny on the Whiteness of Film, Sensitive Horses, and Why It's Hard for Her to Lie

It took less than a minute for Chloë Sevigny to cut through the formalities that placed us in the same room at the same time last month, and get real. Having noticed her bluntness in interviews over the years, and especially in my prep for my chat with her at the A24 office in Manhattan, I thought maybe she’d have a…

An 'Accidental Jane Austen Superfan' on Stepping Into Mr. Darcy's Tights and the Wonder of Austenworld

“Some are born Janeites, some achieve Janeism, and some have Janeism thrust upon them,” Ted Scheinman writes in his charming new book, Camp Austen: My Life as an Accidental Jane Austen Superfan. For Scheinman, his temporary entry into Austen fandom was a bit of all three, done “half willingly and half accidentally.”