'Selena for Sanctuary' Concert Series Has Raised Over $10K in Legal Fees for Immigrant Rights 

DAMROSCH PARK, NEW YORK — Dancing tias and teens commandeer the aisles before the performers even enter stage left. Beer, sweat, and laughter permeate the air like the holy trinity of every good fiesta. The message, for once, is not to assimilate, but to celebrate and relish in the Latinx community’s roots. The Selena…

Lauren Greenfield on Generation Wealth and the Culture of Money That Made Trump Possible

In the 1990s, director/photographer Lauren Greenfield began a project taking pictures of high school students at her affluent Los Angeles alma mater, Crossroads. One of the shots was of a group of boys flashing what Greenfield thought were dollar bills at her. Later at home, when she reviewed the camera’s film, she…

'Women's Identity Is Composed of Myths': Author Samantha Hunt on Mermaids and the Reissue of The Seas 

Nearly a decade before Samantha Hunt published her haunting novel Mr. Splitfoot and years before The Invention of Everything Else was shortlisted for the Orange Prize, she published The Seas, a poetical and ghostly novel about a girl stuck in a seaside town struggling with the nature of identity and language.…

Monét X. Change, Serving You 'Queen of Wakanda', Is the Queen of Our Hearts

On the first true day of warm, spring weather in New York, RuPaul’s Drag Race contestant Monét X. Change swept out of the bathroom, resplendent in a purple and green printed gown, covered in what looked like abstract renderings of heads of lettuce and maybe, a human brain. “I got this at the Bronx Terminal Market,…

A Conversation with Director Nancy Buirski About the Untold Story of Recy Taylor

On September 3, 1944, 24-year-old Recy Taylor was walking home from a church revival in rural Alabama. That evening, she later reported, she was kidnapped at gunpoint and raped by six white teenage boys. According to court records, her attackers said they’d kill her if she talked. She talked anyway, which led to a…

Philosopher Kate Manne on 'Himpathy,' Donald Trump, and Rethinking the Logic of Misogyny

There are few things more perennially relevant than a book about misogyny, but Kate Manne’s Down Girl: The Logic of Misogyny is particularly resonant in the era of #MeToo, Donald Trump, and the often contentious narratives that flow from both. A philosophy professor at Cornell University, Manne uses the tools of her…

Grammy-Nominated Artist Julia Michaels 'Doesn't Do Anything Half-Assed'

Julia Michaels specializes in a certain kind of pop music therapy. As a songwriter, she sits down with singers like Justin Bieber, Selena Gomez, and Gwen Stefani; talks to them about what the hell is going on in their lives; and then scales that down into a perfect song: “Sorry,” “Hands to Myself,” “Used to Love You.”…

Lessons From a Man Who Actually Did Something About His Community’s Carbon Footprint

It was easy enough to suppose, during the Obama years, that protecting the planet from the worst impacts of climate change was mostly a matter for heads of state and industry. Those efforts had been failing pretty drastically, of course—thanks in large part to a small handful of twisted energy industry billionaires…

A Chat With Sandra Oh and Anne Heche About Rage, Violence, and Their Timely New Film Catfight

Last night I saw Logan, Hugh Jackman’s final Wolverine film, and the first of the series to be rated R. It’s filled with the kind of violence you’d expect from a movie about an angry, alcoholic superhero with razor-sharp claws buried beneath his knuckles and almost nothing to live for—heads are chopped off, throats…