'Women's Identity Is Composed of Myths': Author Samantha Hunt on Mermaids and the Reissue of The Seas 

Nearly a decade before Samantha Hunt published her haunting novel Mr. Splitfoot and years before The Invention of Everything Else was shortlisted for the Orange Prize, she published The Seas, a poetical and ghostly novel about a girl stuck in a seaside town struggling with the nature of identity and language.…

Carmen Maria Machado on Her New Book & the 'Surreal Horror' of 'Being a Woman or Queer Person in the World'

The women of Carmen Maria Machado’s debut collection Her Body and Other Parties are haunted, invisible, stitched together, loved, in love, alone, dead, and alive at the end of the world. The women who populate Machado’s short stories defy easy categorization, much like her book itself. Her Body and Other Parties is a…

Fiction Writer Is Being Accused of Weaving a Breathtaking Web of Questionable Achievements 

Praise for journalist Rich Smith’s article on The Stranger, “Meet John Smelcer, Native American Literature’s ‘Living Con Job’”: a profile of a fiction writer who starting claiming a strong Alaskan Native identity as early as 1994 and then appears to have run with a twenty-five-year string of inflated credentials and…

Paula Hawkins Talks 'Troublesome Women,' 'Good Men,' and Her New Book, Into the Water

Paula Hawkins’s new page-turner, Into the Water, is set is in Beckford, a small tourist town in northern England. The town is unremarkable excepting its scenery; Beckford sits on an attractive river that draws tourists to play on its sandy banks and lures “troublesome women” to their watery deaths. The bend in the…