Image: Getty, George V Tiger Hunt, 1912

In New Delhi, the two-year hunt for an infamous man-eating tiger is over. T-1, a female tiger suspected in the deaths of 13 villagers, has been killed after experts claimed she had “developed a taste for human flesh.” But the tigress, mother to two cubs, didn’t go down without a fight, The Boston Globe reports. It took hundreds of cameras, drones, and professional tiger-hunting elephants to bring T-1 down.

“The operation grew and grew, eventually encompassing a heat-seeking drone, more than 100 remote cameras, and a team of specially trained Indian elephants with sharpshooters mounted on their backs. It became one of the biggest, longest, and most expensive tiger hunts in India in recent memory.”

But it gets weirder.

Apparently your middle school boyfriend’s favorite cologne, Obsession, is the weapon that finally ended the years-long hunt. You see, the same smelly chemical that got you all atwitter at the prospect of being inexpertly felt up under the bleachers after the Valentine’s dance also makes tigers super horny.

“Obsession (a popular men’s fragrance in the 1990s) contains civetone, a compound originally derived from the scent glands of a civet and proved to make wildcats go gaga. In areas where it has been sprayed, cats roll around in it, and they take huge sniffs and luxuriate in the smell for several minutes.”

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So after months of being one step behind T-1, hunters sprayed some Obsession and tiger urine around the area where she was believed to be hiding. Although the plan was originally to tranquilize the tiger, she understandably roared and charged after being hit with the dart, prompting the shots that killed her.

While villagers celebrated T-1's death with parties, fireworks and candy, wildlife activists argue that killing the tiger was unnecessary.

‘“This is a coldblooded murder,” said Jerryl Banait, an animal rights advocate who had gone all the way to India’s Supreme Court in an attempt to force the authorities to spare the tiger’s life and capture her instead.’

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Authorities argue that they acted in self-defense after T-1 charged.

Man-eating tigers are a growing problem in India, where tighter poaching laws mean the tiger population is rebounding, but also that many of the animals make their homes near busy farmland. No word on what will happen to the cubs, though authorities have previously stated that they hoped to apprehend T-1 in a way that wouldn’t harm them.