It's Official: Blue Ivy Is a Cultural Icon

Image: via Getty

In her seven short years on Earth, Blue Ivy, child of stars and light, has proven herself as much a touchstone of our time as the woman who birthed her. Now, it’s official: Blue Ivy is a cultural icon. At least according to her mother, who recently filed court documents in a trademark case alleging as such.

The Blast reports that Beyoncé is locked in a legal battle with one Wendy Morales, a wedding planner whose company, Blue Ivy, happens to share the same name as Bey’s firstborn. Apparently, Beyoncé’s been trying to trademark her daughter’s name, but Morales claims she already holds that trademark, having bestowed “Blue Ivy” upon her company a full three years before Blue Ivy Carter was born.

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Of course, the store is called “Blue Ivy,” and Beyoncé wants to trademark “Blue Ivy Carter,” because “the presence of the word ‘CARTER’ ties the commercial impression of BGK’s Mark to the celebrity Blue Ivy Carter rather than Opposer’s regional event planning business,” she alleges in court documents. Beyoncé says Blue Ivy’s fame, in addition to her interest in fashion and design, necessitate trademarking her name (it sounds like there’s a Blue Ivy clothing label in the works down the line).

Most importantly, as the documents point out, Blue Ivy is an ICON (emphasis mine):

Blue Ivy Carter is a cultural icon who has been described as a “mini style star” and has been celebrated for her “fashion moments” overs the years. Her life and activities are followed extensively by the media and the public.

Most significantly, Blue Ivy Carter has achieved a significant amount of fame, particularly at such a young age. She also has a noted and well-chronicled interest in fashion. Given these factors, Blue Ivy Carter is capable of and interested in becoming the face of a brand. For this reason, the factual context demonstrates that BGK filed the Application with the intent to build a brand around Blue Ivy Carter and her public reputation and renown

Beyoncé has also accused Morales of trying to tie Bey’s famous daughter to her brand—apparently Morales had a sale on Blue Ivy’s birthday—and claims the wedding planner tried to extort the Carters for $10 million in exchange for her company. Morales denies those claims, but she CANNOT deny that Blue Ivy deserves her name trademarked, and I’m NOT just saying that because I plan to stock up on Blue Ivy-branded and approved outfits if and when I ever have children.

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