Screenshot: Devon Medical Art

Congratulations to the young Afghanistan veteran who is the first recipient of a successful penis and scrotal transplant—and congratulations to Devon Medical Art for making this brief video that makes the process absolutely mesmerizing to watch.

The recipient of the new penis and scrotum suffered an injury relating to an IED blast, the Baltimore Sun reports, and underwent a 14-hour surgery at the hands of nine plastic surgeons and two urological surgeons, who successfuly transplanted the penis, scrotum, and partial abdominal wall from a deceased donor. For those wondering about the ethics of such a procedure, rest easy—the scrotum is just for show.

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With that in mind, this is what we have: a young man receiving a new lease on life via medical innovation, depicted in one of the most compelling and exciting medical illustration videos I’ve ever seen.

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My intention is not to make light of the circumstances that led this recipient to receive this transplant, but to highlight the work of the doctors and talented surgeons who removed the entire kit and kaboodle from a deceased donor and attached the whole frontispiece to the recipient, with little to no complications or problems! I’d also like to highlight the artistry within this medical illustration video. It’s exuberant and mesmerizing—jaunty even? The way the bits whizz around, attaching themselves to the new body and reconnecting the various bits and bobs. Music would’ve been an interesting choice to add had the employees at Devon Medical Art felt the need, but really, it’s not necessary. Modern medicine is marvel enough on its own!

In a statement from the patient released by Johns Hopkins, the recipient expressed gratitude. “It’s a real mind-boggling injury to suffer, it is not an easy one to accept,” the statement read. “When I first woke up, I felt finally more normal… [with] a level of confidence as well. Confidence… like finally I’m okay now.” According to Dr. W.P. Andrew Lee, director of plastic and reconstructive surgery at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, the recipient should regain normal sexual function. Congratulations! I mean it!