Screenshot via YouTube/InfoWars

It’s been a big week for extended cautionary tale and person running out of media outlets Milo Yiannopoulos. On Tuesday, the one-time head troll of Breitbart dropped a lawsuit against his former book publisher, seemingly minutes after vowing to represent himself and win big. Shortly thereafter, he was seen guest-hosting on InfoWars, one of the last places that will have him. It all makes a lot of sense, doesn’t it?

One year and a lifetime ago, Yiannopoulos lost his book deal, his Breitbart gig, and what little credibility he’d ever had amid an outrage over comments he’d made that were perceived to support pedophilia. (Yiannopoulos was also uninvited from CPAC, where he’d been slated to be a keynote speaker.) In November, Robert Mercer, the shadowy conservative billionaire who, with his daughter Rebekah, was Milo’s biggest piggy bank, sold his Breitbart shares and publicly cut ties with Milo.

But Milo’s star is rising again, albeit only a few...feet...because he is in Alex Jones’s panic room, gulping down supplements while wearing the worst bow tie ever designed. He was spotted by British writer Ross McCafferty:


“Let me remind you about InfoWars life’s Icuren,” Yiannopoulos booms. “The best endorsement I can give you is I’m very careful about what I put inside myself, as many—I won’t make that joke, actually, we go out on the radio, don’t we?”

There’s a full 12-minute segment here, including an extended period of Yiannopoulos struggling to take live calls from InfoWars fans, if you need that in your life:

Yiannopoulos has appeared on InfoWars several times before, usually as a special guest. Just weeks ago he gabbed with noted racist and disinformation specialist Roger Stone about abortion. (I won’t tell you what their very surprising views are, you’ll have to guess. Just kidding, they’re exactly what you think!)


But watching him sell supplements like a QVC model whose hair has been in a tragic bleach accident is new and quite funny. “Milk thistle extract,” he says, after wincing and gulping a mouthful of pills, followed by some vaguely incorrect facts about “toxins.” InfoWars supplements are, as we’ve written, backed by some extremely questionable science and promoted by Alex Jones’ preferred medical doctor, who is in fact a chiropractor. Two of those supplements may contain just a smidge more lead than anyone might prefer.

All of this fits nicely with Milo’s last few months, in which he’s loudly insisted that he’s doing very well and is not mad, but is actually laughing. During his suit with Simon and Schuster, the publishing giant responded by filing an exhibit with a completed draft of his book and the many brutal, despairing notes on it from the editor tasked with making it readable. In announcing that he was dropping the suit, Yiannopoulos claimed to have made “a million dollars” and wrote on Facebook, “I cost Simon and Schuster a fortune in legal fees and gave them one hell of a bloody nose.”

Are bloody noses a side effect of lead-filled supplements? Just curious. We’re excited for Milo’s next chapter, which presumably involves selling Tummy Tea and herbal slimming wraps on Instagram.