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Trump-Supporting Republican Congressional Candidate Believes QAnon Conspiracy Theory

Illustration for article titled Trump-Supporting Republican Congressional Candidate Believes QAnon Conspiracy Theory
Photo: Nicholas Kamm / AFP (Getty Images)

In an interview with the Guardian, Republican Congressional candidate Angela Stanton King said that she believed the QAnon conspiracy theory that the online retailer Wayfair is secretly trafficking children online as part of a deep-state plot.

When asked if she believed the retailer was involved in a global pedophilia conspiracy, she replied: “You know they are. You saw it. You watch the news just like I did.” The candidate then ended the interview. ...

“I don’t know anything about QAnon. You know more than I know,” King said as she walked away.

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Stanton King has been a high-profile Black supporter of Donald Trump since he pardoned her earlier this year after she spent two years in prison as a result of a 2004 car theft conspiracy. She also appeared at the White House with Trump as part of a “Black Voices for Trump” roundtable this February.

This incident was far from the first time that Stanton King has treated baseless far-right conspiracy theories as truth. She has also used her Twitter to claim that the Black Lives Matter movement was “a major cover up for PEDOPHILIA and HUMAN TRAFFICKING.” In August, Stanton King tweeted “THE STORM IS HERE,” presumably reiterating the QAnon rallying cry that references the “storm,” a day of reckoning when QAnon followers believe Donald Trump will reveal the bad actors hidden within the deep state.

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When asked to explain the tweet, she responded “It was raining that day,” despite weather reports indicating it was hot with no chance of precipitation in Atlanta on the day she sent that tweet.

Although Stanton King doesn’t seem to have much of a chance of winning her election, Marjorie Taylor Greene—another QAnon conspiracy theorist running for Congress in Georgia—is expected to win her seat after receiving the Republican party nomination in August.

Freelance writer who loves sandwiches, astrology, & fighting on the internet.

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DISCUSSION

When asked to explain the tweet, she responded “It was raining that day,” despite weather reports indicating it was hot with no chance of precipitation in Atlanta on the day she sent that tweet.

This is such an American thing, to respond to a public person’s obvious bullshit by gathering real evidence to demonstrate that the bullshit is in fact bullshit.

And I get that it means “we know you’re bullshitting, and here’s why...” but almost paradoxically it just feels, I dunno, weaker somehow than letting the bullshit hang there.

We all know she’s bullshitting. We don’t need to be reassured with proof that the bullshit is bullshit. It is clearly bullshit, in context. Nobody ever accidentally tweets the catchphrase of a conspiracy theory they are being accused of believing.

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