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This Video About High School Love Gets Extremely Fucking Real

This video begins as a sweet, captivating ode to high school love—and then it gets very, very real. I’m hesitant to call what happens at the end a “twist,” because nothing about the scenario ought to be construed as a lighthearted game. Watch the whole thing.

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The video, created by the ad firm BBDO New York on behalf of Sandy Hook Promise, is intended to to educate viewers on the importance of awareness.

“When you don’t know what to look for, or can’t recognize what you are seeing, it can be easy to miss warning signs or dismiss them as unimportant. That can lead to tragic consequences,” Nicole Hockley, co-founder and managing director of Sandy Hook Promise, told Adweek.

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“It is important for us to show youth and adults that they are not helpless in protecting their community from gun violence—these acts are preventable when you know the signs. Everyone has the power to intervene and get help. These actions can save lives.”

Night blogger at Jezebel

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DISCUSSION

You know....I don’t think I love this. Who is this aimed toward — teachers? Do we think teachers don’t try to intervene with troubled kids? Students? There were students interacting with this kid, and anyway, asking students to police the behavior of “creepy loner weirdos” is how you get bullying. (And I mean, say you report to the school that the kid was reading a gun magazine, watching gun-related YouTube videos, posting pictures of guns on YouTube. Unless any of that is criminal, what is a minority report about feeling threatened by a kid because he glowered at you while reading a magazine going to do?)

What is the actual takeaway here?

Mass shootings, including acts of mass killing in schools, will not stop until we have sensible gun control, and troubled students who show signs of disturbance require more resources and support for mental health interventions than we currently offer. Those are the solutions, and I’m not excited about passing the buck to this handwavy notion of “awareness” when the problems we are facing are so clearly institutional.