Some Good Points About the Women's March

Image via Getty
Image via Getty

There were some generally valid critiques of the Women’s March on Washington this weekend; primarily, the centering of white women in the media and amongst themselves. The notion that the need for protest has “just begun” with the election of Donald Trump, too, was deserving of critique, particularly considering A) the Black Lives Matter and Standing Rock movements of the past several years and B) the entire history of the United States. (As Indigenize OU cofounder Sydne Gray wrote after being repeatedly disrespected by white women during the D.C. protest, “Our ancestors have marched since 1492. This is our whole lives. This is who we are.”)

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However, there were other critiques of the Women’s March that both amazed and baffled in their voracious efforts to be the worst take. Several of these were published in mainstream, well respected, ostensibly liberal publications. Most either leaned nakedly contrarian for poorly articulated reasons, or were expository efforts to remind us that men cannot handle not being the center of attention for a single weekend. Here are a few of these great, just great points about the Women’s March.

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In which a bus full of wealthy women find protesting distasteful. [WWD]

Illustration for article titled Some Good Points About the Womens March

Voting? For Hillary Clinton? [The Daily Beast]

Illustration for article titled Some Good Points About the Womens March
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What! About! The! Men! [New York Times]

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Same story, different (but no better) headline. [New York Times]

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Then they quietly changed the headline.

Illustration for article titled Some Good Points About the Womens March
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Man who took umbrage with the marches being characterized as “Women’s” because he felt left out (even though all men were invited, just not him) proceeds to write extremely basic take that does not once include the word “women.” Babe, no one cares. [New York]

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DISCUSSION

theburnersmydestination
TheBurnersMyDestination

Ive said it before, but I loved the effort my local march (in lily-white Kansas) made to make sure that the speakers were diverse- in their race, gender expression, sexual orientation, religion, abilities, class, age, and point of view. The crowd was respectful and receptive to all the different speakers, and considering the demographics of the state, it was awesome to see how much diversity their was in the crowd. It was wonderful to see so many people felt safe and welcome at the march (including bringing their kids!).

I know the planning for the Marches had issues, and not all of them were resolved, but it seemed to be a very positive experience, and hopefully it will be a building block for working toward greater inclusion and intersectionality.