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So This New 'Female Viagra' Is Either Totally Great or Complete Bull

Illustration for article titled So This New Female Viagra Is Either Totally Great or Complete Bull

A supplement that promises to be the new female Viagra is being snapped up by women in Britain.

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According to the International Business Times, the little pink pill contains pycnogenol, an extract from a French pine bark. The makers of the supplement, dubbed Lady Prelox, say it's the female version of Viagra. It's actually the female version of Prelox, an existing treatment for male sexual dysfunction.

But is it just hype or does the pill actually do what it promises?

One small study looked at 100 women aged 37 to 45 who followed a management programme to improve their lifestyle, diet, exercise, and stress control. Half of the women also took Lady Prelox. The study - funded by [Lady Prelox manufacturer] Nord Pharma - found women who took the supplement showed a larger improvement in the Female Sexual Function Index, a medical tool for evaluating female sexual health.

Erectile dysfunction in men can be caused by conditions that affect the flow of blood to the penis. But doctors are far from sure if poor circulation is an important cause of sexual dysfunction in women, or whether improving circulation would help treat sexual problems.

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Much of the belief that Lady Prelox works stems from the idea that pycnogenol helps with poor circulation. But doctors aren't yet convinced that the same underlying causes that lead to male erectile dysfunction have anything to do with similar issues in women. One doctor has already voiced his skepticism until further research is done. Chairman of the Sexual Advice Association and a cardiologist at Guy's and St Thomas' Hospitals in London Dr Graham Jackson said there was no evidence that sexual dysfunction in women is linked to the similar causes as men. "I suspect there may turn out to be a link," he said.

It's also really expensive, too. A packet of 60 pills costs £37.95, or about $62. With a recommended dosage of two pills per day, that can get a little pricey.

Dr. Jackson cautioned against looking for any drastic solutions. "These aren't aphrodisiacs. If you're not turned on by your partner, no amount of tablets will help."

Image via Shutterstock.

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DISCUSSION

ToffeeTree
ToffeeTree

"These aren't aphrodisiacs. If you're not turned on by your partner, no amount of tablets will help."

I may be confused about the use of the term "turned on" here. Is the situation that the target demographic can get turned on, but it doesn't last, or get turned on but don't achieve orgasm?

My problem is definitely the getting turned on/getting in the mood part.