Following legal pressure from pro-life clinics such as the Evergreen Association, Inc. and the Life Center of New York, Inc., the U.S. Supreme Court has decided not to hear an appeal that challenges a 2011 ruling that requires New York crisis pregnancy centers to inform women as to whether or not they staff licensed medical providers.

Often located near hospitals or legitimate abortion providers like Planned Parenthood, crisis pregnancy centers work by luring in women by appearing like a fully operational medical facilities. Staff wear nurse scrubs and many of the clinics provide ultrasounds, but, beyond that, they rarely provide any actual prenatal or women's healthcare. Their main (and covert) purpose is to talk women out of getting abortions and, if that doesn't work, put up as many roadblocks as possible to prevent a woman from terminating a pregnancy.

Advertisement

Three years ago, however, a law was enacted that required crisis pregnancy centers to disclose their actual medical credentials (or lack there of) to any women seeking their services. Pro-life groups decried the decision as an attack on the first amendment (whatever, dudes) and that it's too "unconstitutionally vague" and have since been attempting to appeal the decision. The appellate court ultimately disagreed.

That's the good news, now the bad (via Reuters):

The nine justices left in place a January ruling by the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals that upheld the provision while striking down other parts of the law.

The appeals court threw out a provision that make centers state whether they provide abortions and other reproductive care and a requirement that the centers tell clients that New York City health officials recommend that pregnant women consult a licensed healthcare provider.

Advertisement

Small victories.

Image via Shutterstock.