The World Cup is in full swing and, unsurprisingly, some people (or brands) are getting a little too eager about it. On Tuesday, Burger King published a promotion on VK—the Russian version of Facebook—stating that it would award 3 million Russian rubles (around $47,000) and a lifetime supply of Whopper burgers to women who had been impregnated by soccer players competing in the World Cup, according to the Washington Post. Because, as we all know, there’s no greater achievement as a woman than having a child by an athlete with bad hair, or being violated by one.

Shortly afterwards, Burger King pulled the ad from VK and posted an apology. “We apologize for the statement we made,” it reads, as translated. “It turned out to be too insulting. We thank you for the feedback and hasten to inform you that we have already removed all materials related to the application.”

Unfortunately, the king of burgers has a history of sexist and highly questionable marketing campaigns, particularly those involving women’s likenesses without their permission. Last year, Burger King Russia co-opted a photo and an out-of-context quote from an underage rape victim for an ad illustration. And after being featured in an infamous “blow job” campaign in 2009, a model came forward in 2014 to state her photos were used without her knowledge.