Putting Your Baby in a Cage Used to Be Perfectly Acceptable

Illustration for article titled Putting Your Baby in a Cage Used to Be Perfectly Acceptable

Inequality by (Interior) Design, a blog by sociologist Tristan Bridges, turned one-year-old last month and it is quickly becoming one of my favorites. In a recent post, Bridges featured a product that reminds us all why history is awesome: the "portable baby cage":

Illustration for article titled Putting Your Baby in a Cage Used to Be Perfectly Acceptable
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Illustration for article titled Putting Your Baby in a Cage Used to Be Perfectly Acceptable


As I discussed in a previous post, with industrialization came cities and with cities came crowded, cramped living quarters. The baby cage kept infants out of harm's way and gave the family a bit more space. As Bridges discusses, it also coincided with the idea that babies needed a lot of fresh air to be healthy. The baby cage seemed like the perfect solution.


Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

This post originally appeared on Sociological Images. Republished with permission. Images via Getty.

DISCUSSION

jennasauers
Jenna Sauers

My cat would LOVE one of those.