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NBC Reporter Accused of Badgering Bode Miller Until He Cried

Illustration for article titled NBC Reporter Accused of Badgering Bode Miller Until He Cried

An NBC reporter is accused of pushing a post-game interview with U.S. Olympic skier Bode Miller too far, eventually causing the athlete to break down in tears over repeated questions about the death of his brother.

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Miller (who was coming off a bronze medal win) gave an interview with NBC, first discussing how these Winter Games felt different than others he has competed. Then, things took a turn:

The resulting talk with NBC's Christin Cooper was as raw and emotional as an interview at a sporting event can get, as Miller talked about his younger brother Chilly, who died last year of an apparent seizure thought to be related to a brain injury from an old motorcycle accident. The camera zoomed in tight as Bode spoke.

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Here's a transcript of the interview, courtesy of For the Win:

Miller: This was a little different. With my brother passing away, I really wanted to come back here and race the way he sends it. So this was a little different.

Cooper: Bode, you're showing so much emotion down here. What's going through your mind?

Miller: (Long pause) A lot, obviously. A long struggle coming in here. And, uh, just a tough year.

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Cooper: I know you wanted to be here with Chilly experiencing these games, how much does it mean to you to come up with a great performance for him? And was it for him?

Miller: I mean, I don't know it's really for him. But I wanted to come here and uh — I don't know, I guess make my self proud. (Pauses, then wipes away tears.)

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Cooper: When you're looking up in the sky at the start, we see you there and it just looks like you're talking to somebody. What's going on there?

According to For the Win, then dropped to his knees and rested himself on a fence. Cooper is heard whispering "sorry" as she put her hand on his shoulder and walked away.

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Reaction on Twitter, where people normally just sit around and discuss their favorite flower colors, was a mix of outrage over the interview and sympathy for Miller:

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Lastly, Miller himself had this to say, also via Twitter:

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Image via Getty Images.

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DISCUSSION

TadKosciuszko
TadKosciuszko

How about badgering him for his ridiculous MRA beliefs and his ludicrous lawsuit asserting his right to block his baby mama from making a career move to New York?

Sara McKenna briefly dated Olympic skier Bode Miller in California in 2012 and became pregnant. Miller rejected McKenna’s requests for his involvement as a father. When McKenna asked Miller to go to an ultrasound with her, he refused and told her via text, “U made this choice against my wish.” It’s hard to interpret this statement as anything other than Miller wanting McKenna to get an abortion.

Seven months pregnant, McKenna decided to go to college and moved to New York. This didn’t sit well with Miller, who began legal action to declare his paternity and gain custody of the child. After he’d refused to support McKenna through the pregnancy and be an active father, he turned around and demanded custody.

When McKenna had her child, a boy she named Samuel Bode Miller-McKenna, she filed for custody in New York. But in May, the family court rejected her claim, accused her of “unjustifiable conduct,” and bounced the custody case back to California. This is highly unusual given that the baby was born and lived in New York.

In September, Miller and his wife came to McKenna’s home and took Sam away. Thankfully, the New York appeals panel has overturned the family court ruling, and the custody battle will be decided in New York.

The family court ruled that McKenna “did not ‘abduct’ the child,” which really shouldn’t have to be stated at all. Of course she didn’t abduct Sam—he’s her own son, and at the time, he was living in her uterus and not exactly easily removed. But the court insisted, “her appropriation of the child while in utero was irresponsible, reprehensible.”