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Here is some good news!! Luca Guadagnino recently revealed that he hopes to make multiple sequels to his overwhelmingly sensual (pronounced in a whisper like “sennnnn-seeew-uhl”) 2017 film Call Me By Your Name, telling The Hollywood Reporter that the peach-filled Best Picture nominee could easily be “the first chapter of the chronicles of the life of these people that we met in this movie.” You know, like Richard Linklater’s long-running Before trilogy.

This idea was not the result of the film’s critical and commercial success either, as Guadagnino also said he deliberately moved the setting of the film from the late 1980s (as it was written in Andre Aciman’s novel) to the early ‘80s, “around the time HIV was discovered,” as a way of making the disease play a role in the film’s potential sequels.

He said:

“The novel has 40 pages at the end that goes through the next 20 years of the lives of Elio and Oliver, so there is some sort of indication through the intention of author Andre Aciman that the story can continue... If the first one is a story of coming of age and becoming a young man, maybe the next chapter will be, what is the position of the young man in the world, what does he want—and what is left a few years later of such an emotional punch that made him who he is?”

There is nothing I love more than a very long novel about the life of a group of well-to-do gay men whose lives are almost impossible for me to relate to (see: everything Alan Hollinghurst has ever written), so this is tremendously exciting to me personally. Taking a cue from Linklater’s naming structure (Before Sunrise, Before Sunset, Before Midnight), might I suggest the following titles:

  • Keep Calling Me By Your Name
  • Still Calling Me By Your Name
  • Call Me By Someone Else’s Name
  • Stop Calling Me By Your Name
  • Call Me By My Name
  • It’s Been a While Since You’ve Called Me By Your Name
  • Do You Even Remember the Last Time You Called Me By Your Name?
  • Call Me By Your Name: Here We Go Again

I can’t wait for these things to drop every nine years for the rest of my life. Nor can I wait for Sufjan’s next sad bop.