John Galliano: For The Warrior In You

According to Hilary Alexander of The Telegraph, John Galliano's F/W 2010 collection was "inspired by nomadic, warrior-women" and mixed "the moods of ‘savage' and refined craftsmanship." Was it a successful endeavor? I'll let you decide:

Illustration for article titled John Galliano: For The Warrior In You
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Illustration for article titled John Galliano: For The Warrior In You
Illustration for article titled John Galliano: For The Warrior In You
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Illustration for article titled John Galliano: For The Warrior In You
Illustration for article titled John Galliano: For The Warrior In You
Illustration for article titled John Galliano: For The Warrior In You
Illustration for article titled John Galliano: For The Warrior In You
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Illustration for article titled John Galliano: For The Warrior In You
Illustration for article titled John Galliano: For The Warrior In You
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Illustration for article titled John Galliano: For The Warrior In You
Illustration for article titled John Galliano: For The Warrior In You
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Illustration for article titled John Galliano: For The Warrior In You
Illustration for article titled John Galliano: For The Warrior In You
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Illustration for article titled John Galliano: For The Warrior In You
Illustration for article titled John Galliano: For The Warrior In You
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Illustration for article titled John Galliano: For The Warrior In You
Illustration for article titled John Galliano: For The Warrior In You
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John Galliano: Paris Fashion Week [Telegraph]

[All Images Via Getty.]

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DISCUSSION

szielins
Stephan Zielinski

Numbers eleven through fourteen are derived from designs depicted on pottery from the ancient Greek littoral city-state of Olykenae. Since the city was right on the beach and Greece is incredibly rocky, Olykenae was mostly built at the base of cliffs. Hot, friable, limestone, and thus crumbling cliffs. Since women garrisoned the city walls while male soldiers prosecuted offensive operations, the warrior women of Olykenae spent a great deal of time outside— and without roofs to ward off the stones and larger rocks that could fall from the cliffs at any moment, they adopted huge padded helmets to keep their brains from being dashed out.

As you'd expect, these were impractical to fight in; when attacked, they had to drop their helmets and take their chances. They wouldn't do this if a totally pathetic army attempted to besiege Olykenae, of course. But if a sufficiently large or fearsome force approached, the women of Olykenae would acknowledge their presence and strength by taking off their helmets and calling, "Afairoúme ta kráni mas me sevasmó!", which literally means, "We remove our helmets with respect." This is the source of our modern idiom, "Hats off to you!"