James Franco's Naked Ass Gets A Magazine Cover [NSFW]

Illustration for article titled James Franco's Naked Ass Gets A Magazine Cover [NSFW]

James Franco's naked, tramp-stamped ass is farting at you on one of the new covers of Flaunt. Full, uncensored, kinda-NSFW image after the jump.

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Illustration for article titled James Franco's Naked Ass Gets A Magazine Cover [NSFW]

Click to enlarge. In other news of Francophilia, he read a short story in bed for The Paris Review. [ONTD]


Illustration for article titled James Franco's Naked Ass Gets A Magazine Cover [NSFW]

Meanwhile, Jared Leto's naked torso is in British Vogue. Between the two of them, we've got most of the important parts of one dude. [ONTD]


Illustration for article titled James Franco's Naked Ass Gets A Magazine Cover [NSFW]
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Hey girl, Ryan Gosling and his piercing blue eyes is on the new cover ofRussian GQ, which we sometimes mistake for our favorite magazine. [DS]


Illustration for article titled James Franco's Naked Ass Gets A Magazine Cover [NSFW]
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And Gisele Bündchen is on the cover of British Vogue. Those pants. Can we talk about those pants? [Vogue UK]


Illustration for article titled James Franco's Naked Ass Gets A Magazine Cover [NSFW]
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Kiernan Shipka — a.k.a. Sally Draper — is blogging her outfits for the week at Lucky. She takes inspiration from Tavi Gevinson's blog. [Lucky]


Illustration for article titled James Franco's Naked Ass Gets A Magazine Cover [NSFW]
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In other news from the annals of precocity, 3-year-old Hudson Kroenig — son of the male model and longtime Chanel favorite Brad — sleeps with one of those Karl Lagerfeld Steiff teddy bears, and wears lots of Chanel. [The Coveteur]


Illustration for article titled James Franco's Naked Ass Gets A Magazine Cover [NSFW]
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Crystal Renn did a street style slideshow and talked about her job and friends. She mentioned again that she wants to design a clothing line in the future. [Refinery29]


  • Betsey Johnson's rule of thumb is that she never wants to design any item that costs more than a round-trip flight to Puerto Rico. [The Cut]

    Alex Wang says inspiration sometimes strikes him somewhere unexpected, like Home Depot. [Racked]

    Oprah interviewed Ralph Lauren live at Lincoln Center, but Seth Myers won't be parodying the conversation anytime soon. "We've certainly had fun parodying Oprah in the past, but I think on a night like tonight because it's an off week [for ‘Saturday Night Live'], I'm going to let my brain shut down and enjoy it as what it is and for at least one night, not look to find parody in something," he said. "Once a month I like to open my heart, let it get some air." [WWD]

    Prada is launching a jewelry collection. Prices will start at €350. [WWD]

    J. Crew president and creative director Jenna Lyons is reportedly involved in a bitter divorce with her husband, the artist Vincent Mazeau. The couple split this summer, and is apparently fighting over custody of their young son, Beckett (a.k.a. the feet behind Toemageddon). Also, money: Lyons, who reportedly left Mazeau for a woman, earns around $5 million a year at her job. [NYPost]

    Company C.E.O. Mickey Drexler has a thing for asking waiters what a restaurant's most popular dishes are. The most popular kind of pizza, for example, is Margherita. At the Wolsely in London, people reliably order Wiener schnitzel and Cobb salad. This informs his theory of retail: "You know what the most popular ice-cream flavours always are? Chocolate and vanilla, and then maybe, well, I like cookies and cream, but I don't know if that's right. Strawberry? It's the same with cookies: chocolate chip, then oatmeal raisin, then, maybe sugar. And you always have to have this in stock. I tell this to my team when we go out together: you need the Margherita! People like consistency. Whether it's a store or a restaurant, they want to come in and see what you are famous for." [FT]

    Fashion writer Robin Givhan landed a deal to write a book about 1973's Grand Divertissement à Versailles fashion show, in which five young American designers (Oscar de la Renta, Stephen Burrows, Halston, Anne Klein, and Bill Blass) competed against five French designers (Yves Saint Laurent, Christian Dior by Marc Bohan, Hubert de Givenchy, Emanuel Ungaro, and Pierre Cardin) at the Palace of Versailles. Spoiler: the Americans showed designs that were fresh and interesting, and basically beat France's established talents. The show was also notable for the fact that the American designers chose to show their work exclusively on models of color, most of them black. Among them were China Machado, Pat Cleveland, and Bethann Hardison, who has advocated tirelessly for the inclusion of black models in fashion shows today. [DFR]

    Niki Taylor says her gestating fetus has a thing for Taco Bell. "My baby is 'thinking outside the bun' daily, and that thought is three hard tacos with no sour cream, a bean burrito with no red sauce and of course, a Sierra Mist to wash it all down. For those of you who want to do the quick order, it would be the no. 8, to be exact! All I can say is that I live in a neighborhood where nothing and I mean NOTHING is open past 10 p.m., so this little one is already dialed in to the fact that Taco Bell is the only restaurant open until 3 a.m. — enough said." [People]

    Tiffany's has filed an amicus brief in the ongoing intellectual-property battle between Yves Saint Laurent and Christian Louboutin. As one might guess, the company that is known for its particular shade of robin's egg blue is sympathetic to the desire of the company known for its particular red-soled shoes to protect its trademarks. Blue likes red. There's an Orhan Pamuk joke in here somewhere. [WWD]

    Olivier Theyskens says some sensible things about business, creativity, the decline of haute couture, and Michelle Obama and Kate Middleton's style in this interview: "I love to see what they wear but I am not interested. It's not natural. If you are a girl dressing up in the morning thinking about the whole world having a point of view on what you are wearing, it takes the pleasure out of getting dressed." [Forbes]

    A patriotic Singaporean billionaire is working to create a satellite couture week in his home city-state. Parisian couture houses will show versions of their couture collections created specifically for the market. Singapore has the world's highest concentration of millionaires. [WSJ]

    Two male models got into a (staged) fight on the runway at the Gen Art show in Los Angeles, which supports emerging designers. [WSJ]

    Coach had another good quarter. Net profit was up 13.8%, and sales rose 15.2% over the same period last year, to $1.05 billion. [WWD]

    Luxxotica, which makes basically all of the world's overpriced sunglasses and eyewear, had profits that grew by 9.1%, to $150.1 million, during the quarter just ended. [WWD]

    And now, a moment with the Financial Times' Vanessa Friedman, who interrogates Coco Chanel's ongoing popularity among biographers and filmmakers. Although other designers were equally influential, quotable, photogenic, and talented, Chanel is the one who gets written up again and again. (There are three new books about her this year, and two that came out last year.) Why?

    What Chanel has that other fashion designers don't is as basic as the little black dress: a really fantastic narrative. And if history teaches us anything, it's that narratives — stories that can be passed on through generations — are what lasts. Especially narratives that contain love, sex, death, abandonment, jewels, Russian aristocrats, horses, feminism, drugs, Nazis — you name it, it's probably in there. As a result the mythology of Chanel has become larger than fashion. Other designers may — at least in part — have similarly lurid biographies, such as Saint Laurent and Calvin Klein, but they tend to be associated with specific eras (the 1960s, the 1970s) that make their experience representative of a time and generation. By contrast, Chanel's story is both very much her own and generic, in romance novel terms, which gives it resonance to a uniquely broad spectrum of people. Like all mythological tales, it is open to endless reinterpretation.

    [FT]

DISCUSSION

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Is "pruning the roses" what they call waxing your butthole these days?