“As the most up-to-date, comprehensive, and user-friendly website for abortion seekers in the United States, ineedanA.com should not be put in the same bucket as deceptive crisis pregnancy centers,” Rebecca said in a statement shared with Jezebel. “ineedanA.com exists in large part because Googling didn’t return factual resources when I needed an abortion 10 years ago.” She says her website would “welcome the opportunity to collaborate with Google” to “better distinguish and label abortion providers, crucial resources, and predatory CPCs.”

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Google’s announced updates come amid mounting criticism of the company’s lackluster response to the overturning of Roe v. Wade. Google faced intense pressure over its collection of location data that can place people at abortion clinics. Despite its recent pledge to automatically delete data collected at these locations, the company says it will still respond to some warrants and requests from law enforcement (the company received almost 12,000 geo-fence warrants in 2020 alone). And as Jezebel previously reported, linking to the websites of crisis pregnancy centers, in general, enables data collection of abortion seekers. All of this can help build criminal cases against abortion seekers and pregnant people.

Exposing crisis pregnancy centers in their ads is long-awaited progress from the world’s biggest search engine—the same company that previously awarded a $150,000 grant in free advertising to the crisis pregnancy center network Obria. But questions remain: Google promised to implement some of these changes as early as 2019. And, despite stating in its letter to Congress that the company “[does] not allow ads that promote harmful health claims,” Google doesn’t specify how it will handle the influx of ads and search results for “abortion pill reversal”—an unproven claim from anti-abortion activists that medication abortions already underway can be “reversed.”

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If Google actually follows through, the updates it announced this week could be vital at an increasingly tenuous time for pregnant people’s privacy and safety. One can only hope Meta—the same company that recently shared a Nebraska teen’s texts about abortion with police, resulting in her arrest, and reportedly allowed CPCs to use abortion seekers’ data—will take a page from Google and Yelp’s recent actions and announce changes of its own.