Brock Turner Loses His Appeal, Is Still Guilty of Sexual Assault

Illustration for article titled Brock Turner Loses His Appeal, Is Still Guilty of Sexual Assault
Image: AP

The Associated Press reported on Wednesday that Brock Turner, who was convicted on charges of assaulting and attempting to rape a woman while he was a student at Stanford, has lost his bid for a new trial. In March 2016, Turner was found guilty of three felony counts related to his assault of a woman near a Kappa Alpha fraternity party in January 2015.

A three-judge panel of the 6th District Court of appeal issued its unanimous ruling on Wednesday, announcing that Turner had indeed received a fair trial. To say nothing of his famously lenient sentence, a mere six months in jail, handed down by Judge Aaron Persky. In June, Persky became the first judge whom California voted to recall in 86 years.

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In July, Turner’s lawyer, Eric Multhaup, attempted the perverse argument before an appellate court that his client’s conviction should be reversed on the grounds that Turner was seeking “outercourse” with his victim. Turner was convicted on two counts of digital penetration of an intoxicated and unconscious person, so this rhetorical tactic was a disgrace.

Judge Franklin Elia, writing on behalf of the panel, stated that there was “substantial evidence” to support Turner’s conviction. Stanford law professor Michelle Dauber, who led the campaign to recall Persky, commented on the court’s decision saying that “everyone, including Brock Turner, would be better served by accepting the jury’s verdict and moving on.”

contributing writer, nights

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DISCUSSION

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Tool of the Matriarchy

(Read in David Attenborough voice)

The wealthy white cishet male athlete often displays an extraordinary level of violence and indifference towards other members of its group, particularly females. Scientists have been monitoring this individual, who they’ve named “Brock Turner, Rapist”. Members of this sub-species rarely face consequences when they violate the social norms of the group, and may react violently if they are disciplined. It’s quite rare for researchers to witness this behaviour, as punishment happens so seldom for these individuals.

Brock shows a particularly extreme example of this behaviour. He was discovered in the act of sexually assaulting an unconscious female by two male witnesses, yet continued to insist he had done nothing wrong. He was given very light consequences, yet refused to accept them.

He tried to have his conviction overturned because he hadn’t taken his clothes off.

His appeal was refused, but he will not face any further penalty for this extraordinary display of sociopathic privilege. It’s a rare glimpse into the way this society operates.