Since Ariana Grande dropped her latest song “7 Rings,” along with a candy-pink video that split the distance between bisexual lighting and a bronzer accident, she has been accused of stealing multiple other artists’ flow and video concepts particularly in relation to weave, with messy results all around.

It began with Princess Nokia tweeting a video that seemed to accuse Grande of jacking her idea from Nokia’s “Mine,” a black-and-brown-woman-centering song about buying weave with the chorus “It’s mine/I bought it”—as opposed to Grande’s line, “You like my hair? Gee, thanks/Just bought it.” (Nokia later removed her post after she was, in kind, accused on social media of jacking Kali Uchis’s “Honey Baby” with her song “Orange Blossom.”) Nokia ended her video with the line, “Ain’t that the little song I made about brown women and their hair? Hmm, sounds about white.”

“7 Rings” is clearly not the first track with the flow Grande is attempting, but Soulja Boy had an even earlier claim to it, with 2010's “Pretty Boy Swag.” (It should be noted here that Soulja Boy is currently on an extremely funny beef tour, and should host the Oscars.)

On Saturday, 2 Chainz pondered if he should also point out the “7 Rings” video’s similarity to his own signature Pink Trap House—which was, of course, just a way for him to point it out sideways.

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But it’s deeper than a swagger jack, as proven by an Instavid Grande posted that quoted a fan sarcastically commenting that “White women talking about their weaves is how we’re gonna solve racism.” Grande posted and deleted, perhaps misunderstanding where the sarcasm was pointed, and then dove into The Shade Room comments to explain herself.

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I have a far different interpretation of the original poster’s intent than she did? Either way, Ariana Grande is sorry! Also, her new album is dropping February 8.