Image: Getty

Harvey Weinstein turned himself in to the NYPD on Friday for charges of rape, a criminal sex act, sex abuse and sexual misconduct. He was released within a few hours on $1 million bail. One of his alleged victims, Annabella Sciorra, writes that seeing him heading to court brought her “no relief.”

In her Twitter thread on Sunday, Sciorra says there’s nothing to celebrate about Weinstein being arrested, because his money and power allowed him to quickly circumvent the system. She mentions Kalief Browder, a 16-year-old who was held on Rikers Island for three years for allegedly stealing a backpack, much of his time there in solitary confinement.

Advertisement

In an essay for Time, Ashley Judd also expressed a lack of celebration for Weinstein’s arrest, saying she “didn’t have a reaction.”

As I spoke with others for whom the ground was shaking I realized my feeling was that a sexual predator being legally accountable for criminal behavior is and should be normal, routine and not particularly newsworthy. And I also understood why it is thunderous news.

Advertisement

Judd goes on to say she hopes that in the era of #MeToo we will see an example of “restorative justice” embodied by one of the accused, someone who “can navigate the duality of having aggressed and address their abuse of power with culpability and integrity.”

Based on the narrative Weinstein’s lawyer has already begun to spin, we won’t be seeing that example anytime soon.