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Beware the Google listserv, the most searchable and damning collection of group thinking.

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The Harvard Crimson reports that the Harvard men’s soccer team’s Google listerv was recently public and searchable, and it turned up a pretty terrible document from 2012, called a “scouting report.” The report consisted of members of the men’s team rating and analyzing freshman recruits to the women’s soccer team based on their perceived sexual attractiveness. Each young woman was given a numerical score, assigned a sexual position, and had her picture included in the document.

The Crimson found the last known example of the report in the soccer team’s listserv, disseminated on July 31, 2012, and it includes paragraphs by the unnamed author ruminating on his fellow athletes value:

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“She seems relatively simple and probably inexperienced sexually, so I decided missionary would be her preferred position,” the author wrote about one woman. “Doggy style,” “The Triple Lindy,” and “cowgirl” were listed as possible positions for other women.

The author also assigned each woman a nickname, calling one woman “Gumbi” because “her gum to tooth ratio is about 1 to 1.”

“For that reason I am forced to rate her a 6,” the author added.

“She seems to be very strong, tall and manly so, I gave her a 3 because I felt bad. Not much needs to be said on this one folks,” the author wrote about another woman.

Concluding his assessment of one woman, the author wrote, “Yeah… She wants cock.”

Members of the 2012 team declined to comment on the document, or confirm whether its practice continued. But emails indicate it wasn’t the first year a scouting report had been assembled, as other members urged the author to release the report as soon as possible. The author also wrote at one point that “while some of the scouting report last year was wrong, the overall consensus that [Redacted] was both the hottest and the most STD ridden was confirmed.”

On Monday, Harvard’s Director of Athletics Robert L. Scalise was made aware of the document for the first time and told the Crimson, “Any time a member of our community says things about other people who are in our community that are disparaging, it takes away from the potential for creating the kind of learning environment that we’d like to have here at Harvard.”

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Scalises added that Harvard is not isolated from the world at large, noting that, “These things exist in our society” and that “Society hasn’t figured out a way to stop these things from happening... Whenever you have groups of people that come together there’s a potential for this to happen.” (He also made it a point to suggest that the situation should not be further discussed in the media.)

Both Scalise and the current men’s soccer team coach Pieter S. Lehrer have vowed to speak with their current athletes about the document, but suggested that it was behavior that does not continue today. “The information contained in this document from 2012 is unacceptable, and I am saddened to see this level of disrespect shown to these women,” women’s soccer coach Christopher P. Hamblin emailed the Crimson, continuing to add that since Lehrer had been hired in 2013, there has been “a huge shift in the culture of the men’s soccer program at Harvard.” But the news comes the same year Harvard controversially placed restrictions on the school’s single-gender clubs following reports of sexism and sexual assault among the members of their so-called “final clubs.”

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The men’s soccer team roster from the 2012 season has been removed from the Harvard Athletics website. In better news, the women’s soccer team is currently holding tight to “its second-place standing in the Ivy League.” If you’re a Harvard student and know more, get in touch.

This post has been updated.