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Deadpool: A Superhero Movie for People Who Are Sick Of Superhero Movies

When Deadpool shoots, he kills, and when he pokes at the conventions of the superhero movie genre, he twists his katana. Tim Miller’s Deadpool is a satirical exercise in excess along the lines of Paul Verhoeven’s original Robocop—it is gratuitously violent, profane, and self-aware. And like Robocop, Deadpool manages…

Michael Fassbender's Macbeth Is an Impossibly Bleak Look at Shakespeare's Maddest King

Justin Kurzel’s Macbeth—starring Michael Fassbender and Marion Cotillard—opens on a shot of a dead child’s face and only gets darker from there. While Shakespeare’s play about the Scottish thane and his wife who murder their way into power has never been a joyous romp, there’s something staggeringly bleak about this…

Autre Ne Veut's Age of Transparency Is Unpredictable, Elusive, and Totally Consuming

A master class in that which is transcendently extra, the title track of Autre Ne Veut’s new album Age of Transparency begins in an indeterminate spiritual potpourri of ghostly choral moaning and soap-opera piano: the sax line comes in sounding like a sunset being airbrushed onto a billboard, the constellations…

Two Drunk Girls Hear Fetty Wap for the First Time

In the arena of music criticism, one of the most common (and objectively embarrassing) phenomena is that of the listening session—that magical time when journalists gather together as one in an office or nightclub of the label’s choosing to listen to an album in advance of its release date, often plied with alcoholic…

Scream Queens Is Offensive, Tasteless, and Pretty Fucking Funny

“Name one bad thing that’s ever happened in a Best Buy parking lot,” a security guard tells her friend midway through the Scream Queens pilot. The joke, of course, is a reference to the death of Hae Min Lee, whose real-life murder—a story popularized by the podcast Serial—may have happened in the parking lot of a Best…

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Carly Rae Jepsen's Emotion: Ebullient Love Songs For the Everygal

After Carly Rae Jepsen’s enormous 2012 hit “Call Me Maybe,” it seemed like the Canadian pop star would be relegated to one-hit wonder territory. The album it spurred, Kiss, never produced a single as big, plus the ubiquity of “Maybe” is difficult to top and lightning that cheesy doesn’t strike twice. But what Jepsen…