Irony is when a guy profiting from revenge porn demands that Google remove his "identity" from their search engines pointing to stories about how the Federal Trade Commission is shutting him down. LOLNO.

Craig Brittain, the man behind the site IsAnybodyDown.com, is whipping out all of the digital laws to protect what's left of his professional image after finding himself in the FTC's crosshairs, according to Ars Technica. The FTC says Brittain, based in Colorado Springs, Colorado, nefariously posed as a woman online to acquire and then post intimate pictures of women he chatted with online. Then Brittain led them to his site where he extorted them for hundreds of dollars in trade for removing the images. He was also making $3,000 each month in advertising, according to CBS News. The world is a terrible place.

Google is, of course, ignoring all of his 23 requests via the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) to remove stories linking him to reports on how horrible a person he is and how sleazy his website was—before the FTC shut him down.

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In addition to claims that the links contain "unauthorized" information about him, Brittain asserts "unauthorized use of statements and identity related information. Unauthorized copying of excerpts from isanybodydown.com. Using photos which are not 'fair use.'"

LOL at 'fair use' when this guy was publishing people's naked bodies without their permission.

Unlike the U.S. however, Europe does allow people "the right to be forgotten," meaning a person's history can be erased from the Internet in certain circumstances if they request it. Remember Iggy Azalea's rumored sex tape? During her dust-up, she also fussed that America should have a similar law and take revenge porn as seriously as the continent. Maybe she's right, but Brittain seems to be getting his just desserts without it.

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Image via CBS News.