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Melania Trump last covered Vogue in January of 2005, the same month she was wed off to a tangerine Demogorgon to settle the debt of her parents, who stole magic beans from Donald Trump’s enchanted vegetable garden when she was only one year old. But following her husband’s controversial and upsetting win in the 2016 presidential race, many a brilliant mind is wondering whether or not Melania will appear on the cover of Vogue again, this time as First Lady.

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Vogue, despite Anna Wintour’s vocal and financial support of Hillary Clinton (and Sienna Miller’s puzzling insistence otherwise), will, more than likely, feature Melania on the cover at some point over the next four years.

As reported by Business of Fashion:

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“While we never comment on future editorial, Vogue has a long, rich history, dating back to Mrs. Helen Taft, of covering America’s First Ladies, regardless of party affiliation,” said a representative for the title. In addition to Mrs. Taft, Vogue has photographed every First Lady since Lou Hoover, with the exception of Bess Truman. Hillary Clinton made history when she became the first First Lady to appear on the cover of the magazine in December 1998. Michelle Obama has since appeared on the cover three times since 2009, most recently on the December 2016 cover.

Meanwhile, French designer Sophie Theallet, a favorite of First Lady Michelle Obama, has stated that she will not dress Melania Trump to protest her husband’s bigoted rhetoric.

“As one who celebrates and strives for diversity, individual freedom and respect for all lifestyles, I will not participate in dressing or associating in any way with the next First Lady,” Theallet told Women’s Wear Daily. “The rhetoric of racism, sexism and xenophobia unleashed by her husband’s presidential campaign are incompatible with the shared values we live by. I encourage my fellow designers to do the same.”

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As WWD notes, Melania Trump has appeared on the campaign trail wearing “Ralph Lauren, Gucci, Fendi, Dolce & Gabbana and Michael Kors among other labels.” However, all of her clothes were purchased online or in stores, none with the blessing or involvement of the designers.

Whether or not other designers will follow Theallet’s lead is to be determined, but imagining Melania Trump showing up to the Inaugural Ball in a repurposed prom dress from Dillard’s is giving me a rare laugh right now.