Emily Sears—a banging model with an hourglass bod and a large Instagram following—is no stranger to unwanted dick pics. Luckily, she’s come up with an extremely rewarding way to deal with them—by sending screengrabs to the senders’ wives, girlfriends, sisters, and moms.

When she’s feeling generous, Sears will merely respond to the dicks who send dick pics with screen captures from Facebook and Twitter that prove that she could easily contact their loved ones if she felt the inclination.

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“We send the photos as a reminder for them to have respect for women,” Sears tells Buzzfeed News. “I think it provides an accountability that people seem to lose online; being behind a screen gives people a false sense of anonymity.”

Other times, she’ll go as far as to reach out the senders’ wives and girlfriends. It’s a practice she shares with her friend, L.A. DJ Laura Luxx:

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“I think the first time I decided to contact a girlfriend was probably close to two years ago when I opened my Instagram inbox to yet another dick pic with an explicit caption about wanting to fuck me from some random guy I’d never spoken to,” Laura told BuzzFeed News.“I wrote back, telling him that his behavior was terrible, and he replied with a string of sexual slurs and abuse, and kept calling me a slut.”

When Laura clicked on the profile of the man to block him, she noticed almost every photo he had posted was with his girlfriend, and was described in captions by his girlfriend as “the best boyfriend ever!”

“I guess I felt really sad for her,” Laura said. “So I sent her a message with a screenshot of our conversation telling her that I was really sorry, but I thought she deserved to know how her boyfriend was behaving towards other women. “I know if the roles were reversed and it was my boyfriend sending that shit out, I would want to know.”

Sears, who estimates she receives about 1-2 dick pics a day, tells Buzzfeed that the number of photos have started to taper after she started publicizing her outing practices. Until she stops getting inappropriate photos entirely, she’s happy to do what she can to raise awareness of this dickerrific brand of online harassment.

“This isn’t just happening to models with a big followings,” she says. “It’s happening when women are online dating and denying matches with men. It can happen to any woman online, just like it can happen to any woman walking down the street.”


Contact the author at madeleine@jezebel.com.

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Images via Instagram.