Lady Gaga Uncomfortable With 'What People Want From a Female Pop Star'

Lady Gaga is on the December cover of Glamour magazine — the Woman Of The Year issue — and inside, she talks about her weird outfits and her desire to change the world.

In an interview conducted by Andy Cohen, Gaga talks about her bizarre get-ups and beauty standards:

AC: But do you consider yourself to be beautiful?

LG: Not conventionally beautiful. If there was some sort of mathematical equation for beauty, I don’t know if I would be the algorithm. I’ve always been OK with that. I’m not a supermodel. That’s not what I do. What I do is music. I want my fans to feel the way I do, to know what they have to offer is just as important, more important, than what’s happening on the outside.

AC: I think that’s interesting. Because every time I see a shot of you stripped down without makeup or a costume, I’m struck by your physical beauty. Your layering of costumes—is that because of insecurity? Are you afraid of what’s under all those layers?

LG: I would say that I am. Maybe it’s from the things I experienced in my past, you know? Being beautiful is not so fun when you’re in a business with all men.

AC: Right.

LG: Because it can actually get in the way. So in some ways, the outfits—these creations are because I don’t want to face the reality of what people want from a female pop star. Everybody always laughs because I feel so much more comfortable with, like, a giant paper bag on my whole body and paint on my face. Sometimes I try really hard to take it all off. But inevitably what’s underneath is still not a straight edge. And I don’t think it ever will be.

In the behind the scenes video, she goes a step further, saying. "I never felt beautiful on my own. Ever. It was always lipstick and wigs and clothing that helped me to find my sense of beauty. And I think that that's okay."

She also talks about the Born This Way Foundation, saying:

The foundation is everything that I’ve ever believed in. My ambition was never to rule the world. It was always to change the world. And once I started to become more and more successful, this voice in the back of my mind was telling me to make sure that I staked my claim as a person. The Born This Way Foundation isn’t about money at all. It’s about communities, people coming together. It’s about kids telling their stories to one another, and finding a sense of home by breeding compassion, making it cool to be that kind of person. I truly believe that people can find a happier way, if they are aware of the stories of people around them—people who share similar challenges and similar fears.

Okay, yes. Question, though: That Patrick Demarchelier cover. Photoshop city or what?

[Glamour]