Days after director John Carney lambasted certified British gem Keira Knightley for not being a “proper” actress, her former colleagues took to the press and social media to defend Knightley’s character and professionalism.

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In a recent interview with The Independent, Carney, who worked with Knightley in the musical comedy film Begin Again, said he was “disenchanted” after collaborating with Knightley, a lauded actress whose career has spanned two decades. Carney also remarked that he’d “never make a film with supermodels again.”

In the same interview, Carney then praised Knightley’s male co-stars Mark Ruffalo and Adam Levine, calling the latter “a joy to work with.”

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Right then.

“I like to work with curious, proper film actors as opposed to movie stars,” Carney continued. “I don’t want to rubbish Keira, but you know it’s hard being a film actor and it requires a certain level of honesty and self-analysis that I don’t think she’s ready for yet and I certainly don’t think she was ready for on that film.”

Ah, yes: Keira Knightley, a two-time Oscar nominee, is apparently not a “proper film actor.” So, how far back did your eyes roll after reading this #sorrynotsorry? Be honest.

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After Carney’s comments on Knightley’s workability became public, a slew of filmmakers rushed to defend the actress.

“She was an absolute dream,” said producer Jay Gorman, who worked with Knightley on 2012's Seeking a Friend at the End of the World, in an exclusive with People.

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“Professional, prepared, kind and lovely,” he added.

Mark Romanek, the director of the 2013 Knightley vehicle Never Let Me Go, took to Twitter to slam Carney for his complaints about the actress’ purported “entourage,” which he claimed “follow her everywhere” and made it “very hard to get any real work done.”

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Romanek had a different recollection of this “entourage,” apparently.

Keira’s “entourage” is a lot more low key than mine, which includes my Jewish mother somehow managing to call me during work. Every. Day.

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Oh, and also this:

Lorene Scafaria, who directed Seeking a Friend at the End of the World, was very on board with Romanek’s assessment.

WELL THEN.


Contact the author at jamie.reich@jezebel.com.

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Image via Getty.