Dead People Diagnosed After It Can Do Them Any Good

Scientists now think Chopin may have suffered from epilepsy. So, who else has been the posthumous non-beneficiary of retrospective diagnosis?

Dead People Diagnosed After It Can Do Them Any Good

Tutankhamun: Some scientsists believe the boy Pharoa suffered from Klippel-Feil syndrome, a curvature of the spine similar to scoliosis, that would have rendered movement difficult. (Of course, others also believe he was murdered, so.)


Dead People Diagnosed After It Can Do Them Any Good

Julian of Norwich: The 14th century mystic had a series of visions while violently ill. Now, the popular explanation for the illness is botulism (yes, the dented-can culprit.)


Dead People Diagnosed After It Can Do Them Any Good

George III: It's now believed that between the "madness," his sensitivity to light and other symptoms, the king suffered from Porphyria, a hereditary metabolic disorder caused by chemical insufficiency in hemoglobin production. This would explain his erratic behavior as well as his illness.


Dead People Diagnosed After It Can Do Them Any Good

Abraham Lincoln has been diagnosed with a whole heap of things, mental and physical, but many believe he had the connective-tissue disorder Marfan syndrome, which would help explain his famous height. Some believe that as a result of treatment, he suffered from mercury poisoning, too.


Dead People Diagnosed After It Can Do Them Any Good

Although it's debatable — and would be, given the scanty evidence available either way — there's one school of thought that Mozart was autistic.



Epilepsy May Have Caused Chopin's Hallucinations
[Fox]