Editing Ross Douthat

What is it about the New Year, or 2011, that reproduction is suddenly becoming the focus of such media scrutiny? Could it have anything to do with the coming into power of a militantly anti-choice Speaker?

Cultural sniffer Ross Douthat has also noticed this trend and decided to add his two cents in a recent Times column. Mostly it's a yawn-fest whose point of view can be most quickly summed up by the fact that he refuses to call embryos and fetuses anything except the "unborn." But he's really doing his best to do a nuanced analysis of recent all the media representations of abortion ever and the adoption vs. surrogacy debate. I'll hold back from line edits, but I thought I'd helpfully provide Douthat with some feedback on larger ideas that I think could use reworking.

1. The American entertainment industry has never been comfortable with the act of abortion.

Ross, the recent, sanitized, and mainstream American entertainment industry is not comfortable with abortion. But watch a Paul Mazursky film from the late '70s, say the really wonderful An Unmarried Woman, and you'll find the 15-year-old daughter casually talking to her mother about helping to pay for a classmate's abortion while they set the dinner table together. Note that this is the only mention of abortion in the entire movie. There's no hand-wringing, abortion just happens to be embedded in the everyday.

2. MTV being MTV, the special's attitude was resolutely pro-choice. But it was a heartbreaking spectacle, whatever your perspective.

Is any media representation in the era of reality TV going to be anything but a "heartbreaking spectacle"? On the Real Housewives of New York being late for opening night at the Met is a "heartbreaking spectacle." What network is going to air a woman self-assuredly and quietly going in for an abortion? In this case, and since you yourself say the American media is uncomfortable with abortion, should you really use a reality show as your only case study to show "how abortion can simultaneously seem like a moral wrong and the only possible solution"?

3. Last month there was Vanessa Grigoriadis's provocative New York Magazine story "Waking Up From the Pill"…

Hang on, just a quick word choice suggestion even though I know I said I wouldn't line edit, but "provocative" doesn't seem to quite capture Grigoradis's story. Let me know what you think of one of the following instead: sensationalistic, outlandish, insupportable.

4. In every era, there's been a tragic contrast between the burden of unwanted pregnancies and the burden of infertility. But this gap used to be bridged by adoption far more frequently than it is today. Prior to 1973, 20 percent of births to white, unmarried women (and 9 percent of unwed births over all) led to an adoption. Today, just 1 percent of babies born to unwed mothers are adopted, and would-be adoptive parents face a waiting list that has lengthened beyond reason…Since 1973, countless lives that might have been welcomed into families like Thernstrom's - which looked into adoption, and gave it up as hopeless - have been cut short in utero instead.

Though you don't cross all your t's, I get your underlying contention that it's a tragedy that all these young, poor, unmarried girls now have the option to terminate their pregnancies rather than gestate for 9 months so that a wealthier, older, better-positioned, married woman can take their baby off their hands, and that now these wealthier women are forced to actually pay those women who now have a legal choice to act as surrogates or supply eggs for their (re)productive labor. I don't have any real suggestions on this one, I just thought you could make that more clear.

5. This is the paradox of America's unborn. No life is so desperately sought after, so hungrily desired, so carefully nurtured. And yet no life is so legally unprotected, and so frequently destroyed.

Wait, I'm confused. For something you want to find so concrete ("unborn life," not "a mass of cells"), I'm surprised that you're abstracting here so much. Which life? Whose life? Is this the unborn life of someone who desires a child, or the unborn life of someone who doesn't? I think differentiating between the two might help resolve this paradox.

This post originally appeared at Ph.D. Octopus. Republished with permission.

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