The Drug War: A Bad Idea, But It Is So Hard To Feel Bad About The San Diego Fraternity Coke Ring

Illustration for article titled The Drug War: A Bad Idea, But It Is So Hard To Feel Bad About The San Diego Fraternity Coke Ring

It's been a few days since we checked in on the massive San Diego State frathouse coke ring. So what more have we learned? Well, they just keep arresting more students. It helps that the school president has been so super supportive. But it wasn't that sophisticated an operation to penetrate! "All it took was saying, `Hey, I go to State, can you hook me up? And then it was off to the races,'" San Diego County prosecutor Damon Mosler told the AP.

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The undercover officers in the sting, who looked young enough to be students, dressed and talked in a way that would make them blend into any crowd around campus, authorities say. They started going to fraternity parties, made some connections and then started appearing at other events near campus. Mosler says the officers were stunned to learn how openly drug dealers were operating. "The undercover officers would call the dealers and say, 'I'm looking to score, can you hook me up?' " the prosecutor says, "and the dealers wouldn't question it; they'd just say yes." Mosler says he believes that the dealers, many of them students, were operating under the false assumption that they would never get caught within the insular world of a college campus.

Uh, yeah, might I just bring back up again the fact that duuuuude, San Diego State is totally where some of the 9/11 hijackers hung out before they launched their assault on our way of life. And where, six summers later, no one could remember what year 9/11 had actually happened. So good to have such an upstanding campus on our side of the Drug War, dudes.

Feds Penetrated Drug Culture Easily At San Diego State [AP] Inside the San Diego State University Drug Bust [Newsweek] Related: Eight Great Blunders Of The Greeks [College OTR]

DISCUSSION

andbegorrah-old
andBegorrah

@jennfizz: My reply to you had nothing to do with condemning an individual's choice to use drugs or to legally own handguns or anything of the sort. What gets me about this case is the kids' oblivious attitudes to the illegality of their actions—one asked the arresting officer if his "arrest and incarceration would have an effect on his becoming a federal law enforcement officer," and another, who was found in possession of 500 grams of cocaine and two handguns, is a criminal justice major. It's the irony of the situation and, as I said before, the obvious sense of entitlement and immunity that drew my comment; nothing to do with cocaine itself—it just happens to be the substance traded by this group. If it were some other illegal product and the suspects expressed the same attitude that "they would never get caught within the insular world of a college campus," I would be expressing the same surprise at their stupidity.