Vote 2020 graphic
Everything you need to know about and expect during
the most important election of our lifetimes

Orphaned Baby Polar Bear "Talks" To His Zookeeper

Animal Planet ran a special on a baby polar bear named Inukshuk, who was orphaned at just 10 weeks old when his mother was shot by hunters in Ontario. He was rescued by a police officer and sent to a zoo in Toronto, where he was raised by zookeepers until he was old enough to be placed in his permanent home in a habitat in another Canadian zoo, where he currently lives with two other orphaned polar bears. In the clip above, Inukshuk bonds with his zookeeper, who is torn about becoming too attached to the baby bear because he will eventually leave her. Having never been around any polar bears since he was an infant, he has begun to take on some human attributes…like talking! When his caretaker is feeding him treats, it really sounds like he's saying "Give me another! And another!" After the jump, check out the adorable photos of when Inukshuk spent the night in the police station with the officer who rescued him. Confused and upset, he cried until the policeman sat and cuddled with him until he fell asleep.

Illustration for article titled Orphaned Baby Polar Bear Talks To His Zookeeper
Advertisement
Illustration for article titled Orphaned Baby Polar Bear Talks To His Zookeeper
Illustration for article titled Orphaned Baby Polar Bear Talks To His Zookeeper
Advertisement
Illustration for article titled Orphaned Baby Polar Bear Talks To His Zookeeper
Illustration for article titled Orphaned Baby Polar Bear Talks To His Zookeeper
Illustration for article titled Orphaned Baby Polar Bear Talks To His Zookeeper
Illustration for article titled Orphaned Baby Polar Bear Talks To His Zookeeper
Advertisement
Illustration for article titled Orphaned Baby Polar Bear Talks To His Zookeeper
Illustration for article titled Orphaned Baby Polar Bear Talks To His Zookeeper

Share This Story

Get our newsletter

DISCUSSION

ASmallTurnip
A Small Turnip

@zoobabe: Eeeeexcellent. I feel genuinely better about myself now that I can boast that I'm friends with zookeepers and aquarists. I think it makes me interesting and well-rounded, don't you?

@ShortStaK: As someone who has spent many years in Toronto, and basically assumes that civillisation peters out a few miles north of Huntsville, my knee-jerk reaction is to consider everyone outside the GTA to be mouth-breathing, flannel-wearing, donut-eating hicks. However, I have been well and truly schooled by friends from way, way up north (as far north as Arctic Bay on Baffin Island) about Canadian rural life. And I've been really ignorant. Really ignorant.

They have made very clear to me is that life there is a lot more complicated than, as you say, "get a job in the city and stop trying to be a redneck and hunting for sport!". I ain't defending bear-killers or seal-clubbers, but we city-dwellers have a long way to go to understand the needs and the hardships of life up north. I mean, as much as we think that we're the centre of the universe in Toronto, we aren't, actually. You can't write off the entire rural population of Ontario just because of a few trigger-happy assholes. We have those in Toronto, too. Right?