Guess Which Disney Princess This Is

Illustration for article titled Guess Which Disney Princess This Is

The correct answer is: It's Brave's Merida. The more correct answer: It could be any of the white ones (so... almost all of them?) with a wavy — it's not even curly! Jesus! — red wig on. Ugh!

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Sold via Target as part of the "Ultimate Disney Princess" collection, this Merida is completely unrecognizable as anything other than a conservatively dressed Barbie with a weird belt on. I know these are generic dolls that the manufacturers make minimal alterations to and sell them as Disney princesses, but I suppose that's part of the problem, right? One of the great things about Merida is her unique, unapologetic looks, and that's something the public obviously feels passionately about. These ridiculously skinny, impossibly tiny-featured, giant-eyed weirdos don't represent a spectrum of real women for little girls to aspire to. It's fucking irresponsible, and annoying as all get out.

Although I guess I shouldn't be surprised. Obviously the bottom line with Disney is the same as any other company — to make as much money by mass-producing plastic garbage toys at the expense of the well-being of every person along the way. BUY BUY BUY!

[Target via Observation Deck]

DISCUSSION

tokage
LizardJeff

I agree that there's no excuse for so radically changing Merida's character design just to make her fit in with the more generic glamorized vision of the Disney princesses, and at the end of the day, Merida is really a Pixar princess anyway.

However, the sad fact about those other "ridiculously skinny, impossibly tiny-featured, giant-eyed weirdos" cluttering up the doll aisle at Target (eg: Monster High, Winx Club, Novi Stars, Bratzillas, etc) stems from the fact that...well, little girls kind of like that aesthetic these days, for better or for worse.

Maybe the widespread popularity of the Japanese anime art style in the US over the last couple decades is to blame, I don't know - but there it is. I'm sure this was a totally bottom-line-driven decision pushed by the need of the Disney toy line to keep up with the perceived demand for this type of doll. I'm glad the public outcry has made them think twice, however.