Comrade Bethenny Frankel Doesn't Think Your SoulCycle Protest Matters

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Rich people temporarily rebuking their SoulCycle memberships because of a trending Twitter hashtag aggregated by E! News and retweeted by their celebrity friends was, perhaps, not the most effective or coherent form of organized protest this year (or even decade.) Comrade Bethenny Frankel agrees! In an Advertising Week panel, the class traitor and hero of workers everywhere said she was unimpressed with the actions of her Hamptons social circles after it was revealed that SoulCycle investor Steve Ross was hosting a Trump campaign fundraiser. As Page Six reports:

“People weren’t going to go to a SoulCycle class for a day in the Hamptons because Steve Ross was having a party, that’s like a champagne socialist. Oh really, you’re not going to spin today and talk about it? I’m so impacted, I feel like the world is going to change because you’re not going to put your ass on a rubber seat and drink water.”

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She also revealed her secret, multi-step plan to recruit capitalists under the guise of charity and bleed them dry so she can redistribute their wealth among those most affected by climate change. Marx would have some issues with her privatization of public aid, but Frankel argues that nobody else is rich enough—or cares as much—to do the work she’s doing:

“I’m not going to bulls–t anybody, I don’t know everything, if I get in, I get in all the way. I’ve been all over the world, I’ve raised millions of dollars in relief efforts, and I’ve really cared about each thing and it’s been contagious and addictive for other people to care about each thing so deeply. [...] I never knew a thing about relief work and literally did two [of the] largest private relief efforts in US history based on just being passionate and getting things done and connecting with other people and asking for help.”

I know that the big story here is her charity work, and of course the big important things she flies her private jet across the world to do. But I can’t help but wonder: Who will she wear to next year’s DSA convention? And if I invite her to my Marxist book club, do you think she’ll come? Call me, Frankel! [Page Six]


Five and a half years ago, Kate Middleton toured a war memorial in New Zealand. As Us Weekly reported at the time, she wore a crisp, “periwinkle” peacoat from Alexander McQueen. Her reddish brown hair was up, and her pendant earrings matched the poppy pin above her left breast. A source told the outlet: “They’re very excited to be in New Zealand.”

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Five and a half years later, Kate Middleton has once again donned her periwinkle blue Alexander McQueen peacoat while attending the naming ceremony of a polar research ship named after Sir David Attenborough. Her hair was noticeably lighter, and it appeared she was more tan than her previous self. Just Jared reports she “let out a big laugh” multiple times during the event amidst rumors from the British press that she’s been getting Botox treatments.

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It’s unclear what will come of this breach of the Royal Code of Conduct. I thought it common practice that all members of the ruling class wear something new each day as a show of power. With the revelation that she sometimes deigns to wear her old rags, the future Queen might find that certain elements of British high society be alarmed at such... sustainable... habits. I’ll update this post further as the situation in the U.K. develops. [Just Jared]

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Justin Bieber...[checks notes]...got a “grill” for his upcoming wedding.

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  • Gretchen Rossi is experiencing Postpartum Depression. [Us Weekly]
  • Beyoncé thinks her daughter is a cultural icon. [ET]
  • Cassie Randolph and her Bachelor boyfriend are very sad that everyone thinks they’re fame hungry. [People]
  • Sad! Kylie Jenner and Dua Lipa wore the same thing. [Page Six]
  • Scooter Braun is still talking about the feud we’ve collectively moved on from. [ET]
  • Second man arrested “in probe of Mac Miller’s death.” [AP]

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