Another day, another moneyed clothing company files a copyright infringement suit against Forever 21, offering YET ANOTHER CHANCE for me to defend a store I don't even like simply on the grounds that the blend of fashion industry bombast and incomprehensible waste of time is just such a tantalizing tardorama. Today, Anthropologie is the infringed plaintiff. That's added to Gwen Stefani, Diane Von Furstenberg, Bebe and Anna Sui, who, on Monday, printed up a batch of cheesy "Forever Wanted" T-shirts with the words "'Thou shalt not steal'; Exodus 20:15," at the bottom, a "sly" reference to the Forever 21 founders' Christian beliefs that made me want to hurl because, hello, if you're going to bring Jesus into this, you might think for a moment on that old parable about the rich man and the eye of the needle being threaded by the impoverished sweatshop worker sewing all those deleterious violations of intellectual property, and how much time that laborer would have to spend in the factory to bring home one of Anna Sui's lawyers' billable hours.

But hey, don't take it from me, because a new documentary, "Made In L.A.," is coming to a PBS station near you that will make my point. It's about exploited immigrant workers at Forever 21-contracted sweatshops, and their struggle to win better wages and working conditions for themselves, even staking out the Forever 21 founder's house, which reminds you that he happens to live in the same city as the workers making his clothes, which is how they can turn out those knockoffs so quickly, which cannot be said for Anthropologie or Bebe, which brings us to the parable about casting stones or something. The end. Though we suspect this one-sided blog debate could continue Forever.

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Anthropologie Sues Forever 21 Over Copyright [Reuters]
Related: Designer Sues [NY Post]
Gwen Stefani Sues Forever 21 [MSNBC]
Vigilante Justice [WWD]