On Sunday night, outgoing Texas governor Rick Perry headed to Dartmouth College to talk with their eager young Republicans, a trip that took an awkward turn when a group of activist students attempted to ask him some extremely indelicate questions about his stance on homosexuality. They included, "Do you dislike bootysex because the peeny goes in where the poopy comes out?" and "You have recently been involved in a corruption scandal. Would you like to have anal sex with me later?"

Perry, who not long ago compared homosexuality to alcoholism, spoke to an audience of around 100 people at Dartmouth Sunday night. According to student paper The Dartmouth, when the Q&A period began, things got a little rowdy:

Emily Sellers '15 asked if Perry would have anal sex in exchange for campaign contributions of $102 million, while Timothy Messen '18 accused the governor of comparing homosexuality to alcoholism.

Ben Packer '17, who wrote and distributed these and other questions, said Perry's views were more insulting than the questions.

Several members of the audience said they were excited to hear Perry speak but offended by the questions.

Campus Reform reprinted a list of the other questions the students planned to ask Perry, including, "Does your ideal anti-sodomy law prevent me from playing with my own poop shoot? [sic]" Here's the actual flyer, from a Real Clear Politics reporter who appears to have gotten it from one of the steamed College Republicans:

The flier also indicates that the real intent of the questions was to "more or less mock the individual and the event," in case that weren't clear.

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Ben Packer, the student who wrote and distributed the questions, told The Dartmouth he didn't think they'd achieved their intended effect.

"Since the event organizers knew what we were doing before it happened, they sort of controlled the lens through which the questions were viewed," he said. "The questions – they're funny, right? I think they're funny. I think a lot of people think that they're funny, but since the event had control over the framing of the questions, nobody in the audience laughed. They booed."

Not bad in theory, Dartmouth students, but perhaps a tad more subtlety in the execution next time.

Image via AP