Track Palin, the eldest of Sarah Palin’s brood, has entered a plea agreement in a January domestic violence case in which he punched and kicked his girlfriend before threatening to kill himself with an AR-15 assault rifle.


Per the agreement made in a veterans court, the state dropped two of Palin’s three misdemeanor charges, including a domestic-violence assault charge and a charge that pertained to interfering with a report of a domestic-violence crime.

“As a condition of his entry into that court the state dismissed the first two counts,” Palin’s lawyer, Kevin Fitzgerald, said Friday. “Track pled to misconduct involving weapons (in the fourth degree), concerning being under the influence and having a firearm.” At the time of the assault, Palin had a blood alcohol level of 0.189.


Palin, 27, was arrested on January 18 in his family’s Wasilla home after a woman reported that he had punched and kicked her during an argument “over her contact with an ex-boyfriend,” in addition to throwing her phone and threatening to commit suicide with a rifle,” Alaska Dispatch News reports. He’ll be required to complete an alcohol-treatment program, whereupon his weapons-misconduct charge will be expunged from his record.

If he fails to complete the program, Palin will have to serve a 180-day suspended jail sentence and spend two years under informal probation.

Palin’s arrest occurred one day before Sarah Palin officially endorsed Donald Trump. After serving in Iraq in 2008, the elder Palin pointed out that her son had been irrevocably changed by the experience:


“But my son, like so many others, they come back a bit different. They come back hardened. They come back wondering if there is that respect for what it is that their fellow soldiers and airmen every other member of the military so sacrificially have given to this country.”

Palin memorably blamed Obama for the lack of care offered to former combatants suffering from PTSD, conveniently forgetting that it was Senate Republicans who approved the Military Construction and Veterans Affairs Appropriations Bill, which cut $857 million from programs intended to help veterans. Last April, Obama threatened to veto a bill that attempted to cut $1.4 billion in benefits for 70,000 veterans.



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