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A Democratic super PAC has filed a complaint with the Federal Election Commission with claims that GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump, a man whose head firmly resembles a lone radioactive testicle sealed in a jar of formaldehyde, used his corporation to aid in his campaign.

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The PAC—named the Democratic Coalition Against Trump in an effort to be subtle, I imagine—cited the recent uproar over remarks made by the GOP nominee’s wife Melania Trump during the inaugural night of the 2016 Republican National Convention, in which she plagiarized an entire section of an address made by current First Lady Michelle Obama during the Democratic National Convention in 2008.

According to the PAC, the person who took the fall for the general election’s most recent scandal—a speechwriter named Meredith McIver, who for a time appeared to be Trump’s imaginary friend/tulpa made out of Chris Christie’s missing brain matter (jkjkjkjkjkjk)—is an employee of the Trump Organization. The most telling sign of this lies in who writes McIver’s paycheck—which, if you haven’t guessed yet, is allegedly Trump’s private company, not his campaign.

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If this is indeed the case, it means that Trump accepted a corporate contribution, which in turn is a federal trespass.

“There is reason to believe that Meredith McIver has been performing Donald J. Trump for President, Inc. campaign duties and is being compensated by the Trump Organization for those duties, and not by Donald J. Trump for President, Inc.,” states the FEC complaint.

As of now, the PAC’s leading piece of evidence is the Trump Organization letterhead McIver used in a physical letter to resign after Monday’s incident.

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In what could perhaps be presumed to approach the complaint with the spirit of impartiality, the Coalition utilized an unusual example to back up their claims: John Edwards

“This incident is reminiscent of the John Edwards campaign finance scandal, which likewise involved work paid for by a corporation for a presidential campaign. As such, it is very troubling,” remarked Jon Cooper, the Coalition’s chairman, referring to one of the party’s 2008 primary contenders, in which he violated campaign finance rules. At the time, Edwards used almost $1 million of donor funds in an attempt to hide an extramarital affair with Rielle Hunter.

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In response to the complaint, members of Trump’s camp maintained that McIver was a volunteer, and was therefore not paid for her services.

“If she was a volunteer for the campaign, then there should have been no job to resign from,” Scott Dworkin, the Coalition’s senior adviser, said in a statement to the press.