‘Real Housewife’ Teresa Giudice Indicted on Fraud, Tax Charges by Feds

Real Housewives of New Jersey's Teresa Giudice and her husband Joe were indicted on fraud and tax charges today by a federal grand jury. There are 39-counts against them, which include "conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud, bank fraud, making false statements on loan applications and bankruptcy fraud."

Oh, and Juicy was additionally charged with failing to file his tax returns between 2004 - 2009.

The indictment alleges that the Giudices lied to the IRS, bankruptcy court, and a number of banks as they illegally obtained mortgages and other loans, hid assets and income, and attempted to defraud lenders. This is kind of a big deal. If convicted, the Giudices face up to 50 years in jail each and $600,000 in fines.

Here's a breakdown of what the feds are alleging went down:

In September 2001, Teresa Giudice applied for a $121,500 mortgage loan and indicated on the application that she was working as an executive assistant, [U.S. Attorney Paul] Fishman said. She submitted fake W-2 forms and pay stubs, acting as if they were from her employer, and she and her husband also used false information on bank loan applications.

Monday's indictment also included charges of bankruptcy fraud, as related to the 2009 bankruptcy filing by the Giudices. The couple filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy in October 2009, and later filed for several amendments to their filing, Fishman said. As part of the claim, the Giudices were required to claim all incomes and assets, but Fishman said Teresa Giudice failed to claim her true income from the Bravo television show "The Real Housewives of New Jersey" and that she and Giuseppe Giudice did not claim businesses they owned.

Yikes.

Added to that, Juicy is already currently awaiting trial for allegedly impersonating his brother to illegally obtain a driver's license after his own was suspended for a DWI. He faces 10 years in prison for those counts.

'Real Housewives of New Jersey' stars Teresa and Joe Giudice indicted on fraud and tax charges [Fox News]