In a recent interview with DuJuor magazine, Melania Trump has finally assured us all that her husband, presumptive GOP nominee and cryogenically frozen bog man Donald Trump, is “not Hitler.” Okay.

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This very reassuring sound byte occurred after the interviewer asked the possible future First Lady about comments comedian Louis C.K. made in an email blast last March, in which he compared Trump to Adolf Hitler. In response, Melania was quick to point out that her husband is not a genocidal dictator (or at least a German genocidal dictator).

“He’s not Hitler,” said Trump. “He wants to help America. He wants to unite people. They think he doesn’t but he does.”

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(No word on Benito Mussolini, though.)

She then used Trump’s proposed ban on Muslim immigration, which she referred to as “temporary” measure, as a prime example of how her husband could tone down his overt racism:

“Maybe he needs to say it in a softer way. He doesn’t go after religions. He feels like we need to know who’s coming to this country. If not, we don’t have a country. That’s how he feels. We see how he is, and he wants to unite the country and bring people together and bring jobs back.”

During their conversation, the reporter also mentioned the backlash journalist Julia Ioffe received after her profile of Melania in GQ’s April issue, which included a deluge of anti-Semitic slurs and death threats directed at Ioffe. After the interviewer voiced concerns over receiving a similar barrage from her husband’s supporters after the publication of DuJour’s profile, Mrs. Trump’s answer to both the reporter and the incident was more or less “not my problem, #sorrynotsorry”—and that Ioffe had brought it upon herself.

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“I don’t control my fans,but I don’t agree with what they’re doing. I understand what you mean, but there are people out there who maybe went too far. She provoked them.”


And in case you needed some bonus material, there’s always immigration! When asked about her husband’s prospective and much-criticized immigration policies, the former model—who emigrated to the United States in the mid-90s, with a visa that “generally requires a bachelor’s degree or higher...[but] which foreign-born fashion models are almost twice as likely to receive...than computer programmers”—had some very vague words:

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“The law needs to be changed to help those kind of people...but they can’t just sneak in and be here. That’s what I’m saying. I do have sympathy. I’m a very compassionate person. But don’t sneak in and stay here without papers.”


Contact the author at jamie.reich@jezebel.com.

Image via Getty.