Jeb Bush is making all the noises necessary to run for president, which as a Republican nominee means suddenly coming out as sternly anti-gay. In an interview with the Miami Herald this weekend, he said he was disappointed a Florida state court had ruled to allow gay marriage. In 2012, Jeb suggested gay parents could be role models to heterosexual ones. Principles! Who needs 'em?

The Herald managed to ambush Bush after a round of golf, just days after U.S. District Judge Robert Hinkle said that the state's same-sex marriage ban is unconstitutional and county clerk's have a legal obligation to start issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples today. A temporary stay on the order making same-sex marriages legal was lifted this morning, and couples can apply for marriage licenses immediately.

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Bush was unhappy with all the impending wedded gays, he told the Herald. "It ought be a local decision. I mean, a state decision," he told the paper. "The state decided. The people of the state decided. But it's been overturned by the courts, I guess." I guess. He probably won't be sending a set of stemware to Melanie and Vanessa Alenier, seen above, who sued to be allowed to marry in Miami-Dade County and who were among the first couples there to get their marriage license today:

The Aleniers were joined by a bunch of other joyful, loving couples who Jeb Bushes guesses can get married or whatever [Bush kicks rocks, pouts into the middle distance ]:

Florida voters passed an amendment to the state constitution in 2008 banning same-sex marriage. That prompted a lawsuit and the ban was found to be unconstitutional.

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The president of the Florida ACLU immediately attacked Bush's comments, telling the Herald, ""So the people should have the right to enact a discriminatory law?" (No. States don't have the right to that, or we'd still have laws in favor of segregation and beating your wife when she sasses you, because most people are monsters.)

In a 2012 interview with Charlie Rose, Bush said he was a fan of "traditional marriage," but added, "I don't think people need to be discriminated against because they don't share my belief on this, and if people love their children with all their heart and soul and that's what they do and that's how they organize their life that should be held up as examples for others to follow because we need it. We desperately need it and that can take all sorts of forms, it doesn't have to take the one that I think should be sanctioned under the law."

You will never hear anything that conciliatory about gayness from Jeb again. At least not until after the primaries. And Hillary Clinton isn't one iota better. As HuffPo's Amanda Terkel points out, she told NPR's Terry Gross in June that she now personally supports gay marriage, but also believes it's a states' rights issue.

Image via Equality Florida