Survey Says Most Religious People Don't Hate the Gays

Despite the perception that religion and LGBT intolerance go hand in hand, a national survey by the Public Religion Research Institute (PRRI) shows that statistically, the reality doesn't match up to the perception.

According to the survey, entitled "A Decade of Change in American Attitudes about Same-Sex Marriage and LGBT Issues," not only are attitudes more open than ever since Massachusetts legalized gay marriage in 2004, but that religious bias is overstated:

But bias against the LGBT community based on religious grounds is not as common as it is assumed to be. The latest report found that nearly 75 percent of Catholics think that other churchgoers disagree with same-sex marriage; however, 50 percent of Catholics support it. Though 60 percent of "white mainline Protestants" said other churchgoers protest marriage equality, 57 percent actually approve of it.

This apparently also goes for non-Christian religions, such as Judaism and Islam. A GLAAD study from 2012 shows that people have this bias because of how much certain anti-LGBT religious leaders dominate mainstream discourse and media coverage. This may be why so many people make this association, and why the PRRI survey founds that 31% of millennials left their childhood religion because of anti-gay rhetoric.

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