Image via YouTube.

Fyre Festival, which was cancelled before it got underway, is continuing to make headlines with the many ways in which it fucked over literally everyone involved. This latest edition features a lawsuit from the event’s emergency medical staff, who weren’t even trying to have fun and still got massively screwed over anyway!

According to Page Six, the staff’s accommodations were straight from the scene of a campy horror movie probably starring Stephen Dorff:

Pennsylvania-based National Event Services claims in court papers that when its personnel arrived at Great Exuma Island a few days before the April 28 festival start, its staffers “immediately discovered that the accommodations were uninhabitable, including bug infestations, blood-stained mattresses and no air conditioning.”

The only thing worse than sleeping on a blood-stained mattress is knowing that your own sweat is mingling with the blood stains, giving them new life. But the selfless staff persevered regardless, setting up a medical tent “in response to obvious safety and health concerns for the people trapped on the island, which left NES exposed to serving distressed patrons for an unprepared festival site,” reads the suit. The group is seeking unspecified punitive and compensatory damages from organizers.

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Meanwhile, a $5 million class action lawsuit was filed on Friday against organizers on behalf of everyone who purchased a ticket to the Ja Rule-sponsored shit storm. This appears to be in addition to the $100 million class action lawsuit filed on Monday?! And the other...three? Four? There are so many! More like Fyle Festival, y’know? Sorry, but I had 200 times more fun making that pun than anyone else even tangentially involved with the festival did, so there.

By the way, if you were wronged by Fyre and are just dying to sue Kendall Jenner personally for leading you astray with her bewitching spon-con, well, you actually stand a shot at winning, according to Fortune:

According to William McGeveren, a law professor at the University of Minnesota, concertgoers could have a case against anyone paid to hype the Fyre Festival.

“In the offline world, there is precedent for such claims. For example, door-to-door salespersons using deceptive high-pressure tactics could be personally liable for fraud or violating the California [commercial code], right alongside the company that employed them,” he said. “ The plaintiffs here are arguing that Fyrefest is the Instagram equivalent of door-to-door sales fraud.”

Lots to think about here, truly.