Russian Policewomen to Be Punished For Short Sexy Skirts

The Russian Ministry isn't joking around when it comes to uniform modifications and a new decree forbids police women from shortening their hemlines, wearing wrinkled clothing, and mixing civilian and uniform attire. Male officers are now forbidden from ripping off their shirtsleeves.

The Interior Ministry is worried that the kind of clothing mods that are being made by the police force will undermine the authority of the ministry and prevent the officers from doing their job in the best way possible. The ministry also claims that these alterations are discrediting the entire police force.

"When you meet people, the first thing you see is their clothing, and for a police officer fulfilling his duties, it is crucial to have a tidy and neat appearance. From time to time, we have seen instances of officers improperly wearing their uniforms. … Heads [of departments] must pay more attention to the appearance of their subordinates," [Deputy Interior Minister] Gerasimov was quoted by Izvestia as having said in the decree.

In defense of the police force, Mikhail Pashkin, chairman of the coordination council of the police officers' union said that the problem wasn't the uniforms but the lack of dressing rooms available to the officers. While that doesn't explain the actual modifications of the uniforms, Pashkin had some ideas about why policewomen were mixing up their uniforms for a more attractive look. "Perhaps the girls want to get married. Incidentally, they are thinking about the demographic situation," Pashkin said. Because that's all women really think about, right? Not the fact that some uniforms are ill-fitting.

In response to these allegations, and the fact that the ministry is imposing a June 25 deadline for officers to reacquaint themselves with the dress codes, some female officers have pointed out that the reasons they're modifying their clothes have nothing to do with being sexy or wanting to find a man. The uniforms, they say, often fit badly, have no pockets, and are made of low-quality fabrics that make them impossible to work in. All alterations, they reminded Izvestia, are paid for by the officers themselves, and not by the ministry or the police department.

A recent photo alleging to be of policewomen in Ekaterinburg shows that the modifications may be going further than what either the ministry or the policewomen are claiming.