Amanda Seyfried Didn't Go Naked for Allure's Naked Issue

Amanda Seyfried appears on the cover of Allure's "Look Better Naked" issue — but she opted not to participate in the magazine's cover editorial of actresses posing for implied nude photographs (which featured Naya Rivera, Jennifer Morrison, Clare Bowen, and Krista Miller). "I would have, but my publicist wouldn’t let me!" joked Seyfried at a party for the issue. The actress told Allure that her Les Mis vocal coach directed her to "Imagine [performing a sex act], get that feeling in the back of your throat, and then sing." Whether those prudish brackets are the Post's or Allure's, they suck [a big fat sex act]. [P6]


Amanda Seyfried Didn't Go Naked for Allure's Naked Issue

Adele, who also covers this month's Elle, is on the cover of D la Repubblica in Italy. [Fashion Copious]


Amanda Seyfried Didn't Go Naked for Allure's Naked Issue

Brooks Brothers, which used its archive of patterns and catalog imagery to collaborate on the men's costumes for The Great Gatsby, is launching a capsule collection of '20s style men's wear inspired by the film. [Fashionista]


Amanda Seyfried Didn't Go Naked for Allure's Naked Issue

Hedi Slimane shot some rill 'Murrican cowboys for the latest Hero magazine. [Style.com]


Wal-Mart and Sears boycotted an international meeting held in Geneva to discuss compensation for the victims of the Tazreen factory fire, which killed 112 garment workers in Bangladesh last November. The factory was working on orders for retailers including Sears and Wal-Mart at the time of the blaze. Neither company had any comment on the issue of compensation for survivors and families of the deceased. [WWD]

Christopher Kane says many people, including members of the press, were quick to attribute the quality of his most recent collection to "the PPR — the Kering — effect." (The luxury conglomerate late last year acquired a 51% stake in Kane's namesake company.) But, says the designer, "We did the show on the same budget as every other season. It’s not like you sign a deal and the helicopters start landing around you and everything changes!" Kane says he and his sister and colleague, Tammy, haven't celebrated the sale of the company by running out and buying themselves matching custom tiger-print Maybachs:

"It’s been instilled as a Scottish mentality not to flash the cash; we’re always very reserved when it comes to that. We live in Dalston; we work in Dalston,” he says, referring to the neighborhood that is London’s answer to Brooklyn’s Red Hook. “We’re normal people; we come from a normal background. People are still shocked that I have a Scottish accent. But why would I change my accent?"

[WWD]

Roberto Cavalli says he's not a "really talented" designer — and neither are most of today's big names:

"Sometimes I think: 'In 2050, at Central Saint Martins, what will they teach about us?' The only really talented people of our generation were Alexander McQueen and Gianni Versace."

The designer also says, "If there is one person I should thank for my career, it is God, the creator of the animal print. He really was the most fantastic designer because, wow, the women love it." [Observer]

• Hello, were you hoping today to learn about Karl Lagerfeld's unique perception of time? You're in luck: Women's Wear Daily picked the Kaiser's brains on that topic. Lagerfeld, we learn, awakens every day to the nuzzling of Choupette, his cat. Then he tries to do as much as possible with his day. "I always have in my mind that there are more hours in the day than 24. But in the end I find out there are only 24 hours," he says. "I hope one day we’ll have 48-hour days." Continues the designer, "I live with the idea that I still can do better...For me, everything I did is vaguely okay. I just have to kick my ass to do better." As for other people who want to be as productive as he is, designing dozens of collections per year, making time for interviews and documentaries, shooting photos, and publishing books, Lagerfeld says, "The best advice is to be very organized in your mind. Keep it like an impeccable cupboard in your head.” [WWD]

Marco Zanini, who currently designs Rochas, is tipped to be named the creative director of Schiaparelli, which is getting a relaunch. [WWD]

Beyoncé wore custom-designed costumes by DSquared2, Pucci, and Julien MacDonald on the first concert in her Mrs. Carter World Tour. [WWD, The Cut]

• Total revenue at Louis Vuitton Moët Hennessy, the world's largest luxury conglomerate, grew year-on-year by 5.5%, to $9.17 billion, during the quarter just ended. This represents a slowdown in the pace of LVMH's growth. [WWD]

• Same-store sales, a key measure of retail health because it tracks sales growth while controlling for openings of new stores in the chain, at H&M fell year-on-year by 12% during the month of March. The retailer blamed unseasonably cold weather for the sharp drop. [WWD]

Allison Williams is one of those celebrities we actually trust to give a specific, accurate account of which beauty products she actually uses (as opposed to publicist-penned drivel that dovetails with whatever endorsement deals are currently in effect). She's just that Type-A. So her list of "favorite products" is as you might expect: Armani foundation, contouring powder, eye primer, eyebrow powder. Girl even lines her water line with a pencil the color of her skin. And she washes her face with "a piece of sterile gauze," because, she's Allison Williams, duhhhhhh. [Who What Wear]

• Model Ataui Deng describes her personal "style" as "A bumblefuck of inspiration." [WWD]

• And now, a moment with Tom Ford. Tom Ford found the St. James palace, where he showed his fall collection, so opulent a venue that he had to line the steps with 75 boys:

"I had to line the steps with 75 boys. I had their hair all cut the same way. We had to line them up and cut their hair; of course they had been cast. There were waiters and ushers, and the waiters were all in white jackets and white gloves serving Champagne, serving gin and tonics."

Had to. [WWD]