Many Clergywomen Consider Resignation After Church of England Denies Women The Right To Become BishopsS

Since the General Synod voted against allowing women to become bishops last week, the decision has become the biggest crisis faced by the Church of England for decades, alleges a piece on the post-vote fallout in UK periodical The Telegraph. Many of the present bishops (notably, the Archbishop of Canterbury, who cited "deep personal sadness" after the decision came in) had pushed to allow women into the high-ranking clergy post. Some had even trained women for the ministry themselves, such as Dr. Steven Croft of South Yorkshire, who is "deeply disappointed" by the ruling.

"I deeply value and cherish their ministries as do the parishes where they serve. Alongside their male colleagues, they serve sacrificially, wholeheartedly, with great skill and dedication."

Since Tuesday, says Dr. Croft, he has spoken with a fair amount of British clergy—specifically, female priests and deacons who feel undermined by the ruling—who are so upset that:

"a significant number have talked of resignation and withdrawal – from their posts, from additional responsibilities, from volunteering, from the life of the Church of England... I can understand those feelings. They will take time to work through.

Croft has been training women for a life in the Church since the inception of female priests in 1992.

As vigils erupt outside Church House, it seems that a major conflict between church and state imminent: Prime Minister David Cameron also told the press that he was "very sad" that the movement had fallen short by a mere six votes, saying: "It's important for the Church of England to be a modern church in touch with society. I am very clear that the time is right for women bishops; it was right many years ago. The church needs to get on with it and get with the program."

Let's all boogie down to "Protestant Reformation: The Dubstep Remix."

'Reputation of Church damaged by decision on women bishops' [Telegraph UK]