Kate Moss Disapproves Of Christy Turlington's Twin Sets

Kate Moss gave the second of the two interviews she will give in support of the new book of photographs of her, Kate, to the New York Times. Moderately juicy thing she said about Lara Stone and Christy Turlington, ho:

"I think she's very hot, with her boobs and her teeth," Ms. Moss said, referring to Ms. Stone's gaptoothed smile. "Though my husband says she's not his cup of tea."

Speaking of the model Christy Turlington, one of the Three Graces of the supermodel era and a woman Ms. Moss once considered a paragon, she revealed some of the edge that has kept her relevant to fashion. "The last time I saw Christy, she was wearing a twin-set," Ms. Moss said. "You can think twin-set, but you can't wear one."

[NYTimes]


Kate Moss Disapproves Of Christy Turlington's Twin Sets Word is that one of the reasons Nicolas Ghesquière announced yesterday he was leaving Balenciaga is Hedi Slimane. According to a variety of unnamed sources referenced by Women's Wear Daily and the Times ' Cathy Horyn, Ghesquière felt that the resources and latitude accorded by luxury parent company PPR to the incoming Yves Saint Laurent designer were excessive, especially when he — who had delivered strong, proven growth at Balenciaga and was responsible for almost innumerable trends — was being pushed in a more "commercial" direction by PPR. Slimane, who had not designed for any fashion house since 2007 and who had never before done a women's wear collection, was allowed to change the name of the house to Saint Laurent, move the design headquarters to Los Angeles, and re-do all the store interiors. His first women's wear collection was a critical flop marred by tensions with the press and Slimane's own bizarre and vituperative Twitter ranting. Ghesquière's relationship with PPR top brass was said to have changed with the resignation of Balenciaga C.E.O. Robert Polet in 2011. PPR wouldn't comment on potential replacements, but WWD names Joseph Altuzarra, Alexander Wang, Bouchra Jarrar, and Kostas Murkudis as among the potential candidates. [WWD , On The Runway ]
Kate Moss Disapproves Of Christy Turlington's Twin Sets Here's a preview of the new Tim Walker book. [The Cut ]
This Maison Martin Margiela for H&M video is frankly melting our resolve to not shop at fast-fashion stores anymore. [YouTube ]
Kate Moss Disapproves Of Christy Turlington's Twin Sets Here is a photo of Terry Richardson and Manhattan borough president Scott Stringer. Guess Terry's still dating Audrey Gelman, then. [NYObs ]
  • Oh yeah, wasn't there something we were supposed to do today? Katy Perry and Beyoncé would like to jog your memory: the former wore a skintight blue dress with Obama's logo on it and the latter wore Obama hoop earrings. [MTV]
  • Here is a report from today's Alexander Wang sample sale in New York/indictment of our choices as a society: "I just found out that the first person in line got here at 10:30pm last night. About 50 people or so back from him are people who showed up this morning around 6:30am. One girl even has a tent...One girl near me says she would have gotten here at 4:30am, but her friend told her that that was insane. Innocent bystanders keep asking us if we're waiting in line to vote. It's kind of embarrassing." [Racked]
  • Jason Wu went to Taiwan to speak to students, and WWD reports the designer "received the kind of reception normally given to a pop star that's been out on tour for two years." [WWD]
  • Gisele Bündchen: still gestating. [HuffPo]
  • Coach Inc. is donating $2 million to Hurricane Sandy relief. Ralph Lauren is also making a personal donation of $2 million, and the Ralph Lauren Corporation is donating a further $1 million. The private foundation of the Newhouse family, of Condé Nast fame, is giving $1 million. Hearst is donating $1 million and matching employee donations up to another $1 million. Limited Brands, which owns Victoria's Secret, is giving $1 million. [WWD]
  • Fessler, one of the largest remaining U.S. knitwear manufacturers, is going out of business. The company, which just last year invested in solar technology (with the help of a federal tax credit) to provide for the energy needs of its Pennsylvania factory and headquarters, couldn't get a needed loan; 130 direct and 150-300 indirect employees will be affected. [WWD]
  • Lana Del Rey is not the face of Versace, contrary to what some random on the Internet Tweeted last week. [Vogue UK]
  • Italian police have seized some $83 million worth of property — including a castle — from the Marzotto family. The textile tycoons are the latest high-profile targets of an Italian government that has been aggressively investigating alleged tax evasion and avoidance. The Marzottos are alleged to have created a Luxembourg-based shell company to handle the sale of Valentino Fashion Group to the private-equity firm Permira in 2007, specifically to avoid paying taxes on the transaction in Italy. [WWD]
  • Narciso Rodriguez' collection for Kohl's hit stores one day early, and is selling strongly. [SheFinds]
  • David Gandy is dating the British model Sarah Ann Macklin. Macklin is something of a muse to designer Matthew Williamson, whom she charmed during a night of drinking:

    "We started catching up, and we just get on really well. We were talking and drinking lots of Champagne, then he started telling me about this massive film, XV, for his 15th-year anniversary, and how he really wanted me to be a part of it. So we started working together really closely. Any opportunity to wear his dresses, I will."

    [WWD]

  • Robin Givhan — who, in her position as the Washington Post's fashion critic and, more recently, at the Daily Beast, has written more (and more inanely) about Michelle Obama's "style" than anyone other than (maybe) that obsessive chick behind the Mrs. O blog — is crying uncle. And oh boy, it's fucking rich:

    [S]omewhere along the way, the attention lavished on the first lady's wardrobe became indiscriminate. Rather than debating whether a garment was appropriate for an occasion — a legitimate conversation, considering her position — or the possible effect it could have on the economics of the fashion industry, the conversation turned flaccid and banal.

    It took on a Hollywood tone. People wanted to know what she was wearing, not because it signified anything, but simply because it was on her back. What did she wear to the last White House Correspondents Dinner, to the Congressional Black Caucus Gala, to the most recent campaign event in Virginia? To the debates? There was an avalanche of obsessing, admiring, and gushing. Every garment is not symbolic. Every dress is not fraught with meaning. But the conversation yammered on even though there was nothing of substance to say. At first it was fun. Then it became a habit. Now, it's just a bore.

    You don't fucking say. [TDB]

  • François-Henri Pinault, the head of PPR, has prevailed over the California commissioner of insurance in a lawsuit stemming from the 1991 sale of a life-insurance company with a portfolio of junk bonds to French investors. Rich people make their money in such complicated ways. [WWD]
  • Editor Of British Vogue Reads Too Much Into Common Footwear Choice:

    The delicious point about white shoes - any white shoes - is their utter devil-may-care impracticality. There is nothing of the everyday about a pair of brilliant white patent shoes, shining like diamonds on dirty London pavements. [...]

    In my opinion, a light-coloured shoe is too obvious in the summer. They become more desirable in the autumn, when white leather carries a whiff of rebellion into the short days, an all-important insouciance about the wind, rain and the dark nights ahead.

    Of course, for years white shoes — like white vans — have suffered a bad press. But it's the hint of bad taste that is an intrinsic part of its charm.

    [Daily Mail]

  • Paul Smith is launching a collection of t-shirts inspired by items from David Byrne's archive of Talking Heads-related tour passes, photographs, art, and so forth. [WWD]
  • And now, a moment with Ivanka Trump. Ivanka, what provides insight into people?

    "Golf provides a lot of insight into people. I use it a lot for business. It gives me the opportunity to spend four hours with somebody and see who they are."

    [WSJ]