Julie Taymor Settles Suit with Producers of Broadway’s Live Spider-Man Snuff ShowS

Julie Taymor, the director who believed the much-maligned Titus Andronicus was the Shakespeare play most deserving of a film adaptation that wasn't set on a not-too-distant asteroid colony called "Asteroid Rome," has settled a legal dispute with producers of the Broadway snafu Spider-Man: Turn Out the Dark, so now the theater world can go back to tallying the various bones all of the play's spider-men have broken since 2010. Reuters reports that Taymor argued in a November 2011 suit that she was entitled to at least $1 million in damages because she'd worked on revisions to the show's original book before she was fired in March 2011, and that the show's producers continued to make "unauthorized and unlawful use" of her work once she was gone.

Conversely, the show's producers say that Taymor's claims are preposterous, and responded to her lawsuit with a lawsuit of their own, alleging that Taymor's Spider-Man was "a dark, disjointed and hallucinogenic musical involving suicide, sex and death," which actually sounds like an awesome Spider-Man musical that a more reasonable person like Judge Judy would hear about and quip to the blustery producers, "Don't pee on my leg and tell me it's Spider-Man," or whatever. Though it cost more than $70 million to produce, debuting to poor reviews and almost nightly reports of physical trauma, Turn Off the Dark has already grossed $55 million in ticket sales this year because Spider-Man can absolutely not take a little time off from the pop culture scene without worrying about whether everyone will forget about him. It's really insecure and, quite frankly, embarrassing.

Broadway's ‘Spider-Man' producers, Taymor settle sticky suit [Reuters]